Author Topic: Fermenting a Barleywine  (Read 2678 times)

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2013, 05:23:31 PM »
So the advice would be "don't trust bad Grolsch bottles", right?  ;)
"don't trust bad (or potentially bad) Grolsch bottle cap seals"

This seems like more of a perceived risk to me than a real one.  IME, I have never had carbonation problems with Grolsch bottles and they seal well enough for bottles to crack when they are overcarbed.

If the rubber gasket is dried out, it will be obvious.  I haven't had any dried gaskets that I can recall except when I received a batch of OLD bottles that hadn't been used in maybe 20 years.

You might as well just give advice to say "don't use chipped or cracked bottles or rusty caps."
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2013, 06:00:33 PM »
I think brand new or newer gaskets will be just fine for many years.  I've never had a problem in 20 years with them.  I don't expect any for the Barleywine.  I'm still buying all new ones though for this batch..... ;)

Dave
Dave Zach

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2013, 12:24:14 PM »
I usually do 1 minute per 5 gallons of ale, 2 for lagers or big beers.  You can re-oxygenate up to 24 hours later.  I don't have a flow meter.  I just turn it up until the bubbles start coming. 

I wouldn't trust the Grolsch bottles myself.

And do you have a way to control the fermentation temperature?  Lots of yeast with lots of sugar and oxygen make lots of heat.

Why do you not trust Grolsch bottles?

I thought about mentioning that myself. The rubber seals can dry out and with enough presure you could lose carbonation past the seals anyway.

So the advice would be "don't trust bad Grolsch bottles", right?  ;)
In years of putting beer in my checked baggage, the only leak I've had was from a flip-top bottle. The glass didn't break, cap was still on, but the pressure in the bottle (and lack of pressure in cargo) pushed the beer right passed the seal. I wound up with a closed bottle of beer in a zip-lock bag full of beer.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2013, 08:14:18 AM »
So I have this 1.100 Barleywine fermenting at 61F.  It's steady but not going crazy.  The plan is to leave it here until the activity slows dramatically, then raise to 65F and burn it out at 68F.  Good plan?

Dave
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2013, 08:42:23 AM »
So I have this 1.100 Barleywine fermenting at 61F.  It's steady but not going crazy.  The plan is to leave it here until the activity slows dramatically, then raise to 65F and burn it out at 68F.  Good plan?

Dave

sounds good!
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2013, 10:48:39 AM »
So I have this 1.100 Barleywine fermenting at 61F.  It's steady but not going crazy.  The plan is to leave it here until the activity slows dramatically, then raise to 65F and burn it out at 68F.  Good plan?

Dave

sounds good!

+1

I like to ramp up my ales to 68-70F with a fermwrap in the winter when my cellar's ambient temp dips into the upper 50's to low 60's. Helps the beer finish properly.
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Offline euge

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Re: Fermenting a Barleywine
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2013, 12:49:27 AM »
I think a loose ROT could be 1-2 seconds per gallon?  Re-aerating not sure about and maybe not recommended. I pitched an entire additional fresh slurry of 001 my last high gravity ferment (1.106) when the brew got below 1.050 as insurance. It was below 1.010 at the final reading.

Just chugged along and took about 2 weeks at 70-ish temps.
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