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Hop production in North Carolina

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nateo:
There was a time brewers hated hops from the PNW. So, even if NC's hops don't taste right today, they might be in vogue in 10-20 years. Which is a long time to wait, if you're a hop farmer.

BrewArk:

--- Quote from: Titanium Brewing on January 10, 2013, 06:28:26 PM ---You'd be surprised. I have had great luck with Cascade here in Los Angeles, 34 degrees North. My first year I harvested about 12 oz. off one plant, and last year it yielded about 2 pounds. The other varieties I have tried were failures, so this year i am going to do maybe 5 Casacde plants, with one being my 2 year old plant.

--- End quote ---

That'll be some hoppy brew! 12 oz. x 4 new plants plus 32 oz. from mature plant = 80 oz.  Divide your 200 gallon limit by that & you'll get "only" 2 oz for every 5 gallon batch the first year.  But then...
If you get 10 lbs. a year from your five plants?  Hope you like Cascade!

yso191:
At roughly 35* N. latitude they are significantly out of the band of 45-55 degrees which will result in poor hop cone maturation.  Obviously that would effect flavor, but I doubt that it would ever become in vogue.  Or commercially profitable for that matter.

But maybe they are experimenting with varieties that are modified to develop normally outside the prefered band - who knows?

Steve

tschmidlin:

--- Quote from: yso191 on January 11, 2013, 10:56:48 AM ---But maybe they are experimenting with varieties that are modified to develop normally outside the prefered band - who knows?

--- End quote ---
I don't know who "they" are, but if I was a hop grower in the Yakima valley I would burn any plant that would mature outside of the sweet band. ;)

hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: yso191 on January 11, 2013, 10:56:48 AM ---At roughly 35* N. latitude they are significantly out of the band of 45-55 degrees which will result in poor hop cone maturation.  Obviously that would effect flavor, but I doubt that it would ever become in vogue.  Or commercially profitable for that matter.

But maybe they are experimenting with varieties that are modified to develop normally outside the prefered band - who knows?

Steve

--- End quote ---

You do know that commercial hops were grown in SF at one time, Sacramento, and Sonoma county? These are in the 37-38 parallel range. The reason they are not grown now is real estate in SF and Sacramento, and wine growing in Sonoma. CA is covered at some length in the Hop Atlas.

They stopped growing hops in Sonoma County around 1960 or a little before due to downy mildew and the other agronomic pressures.  For proof there is this place.

http://www.hopkilnwinery.com/home/

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