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double batch

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hokerer:

--- Quote from: tygo on January 12, 2013, 06:38:18 PM ---But to answer your original question, if you're planning on doing them a little bit apart, I would pitch the correct amount of yeast for the whole batch into the first one.

--- End quote ---

Curious why you'd suggest this.  It seems like, considering that a Barleywine is a big beer and is therefore going to require a huge amount of yeast, this could be a perfect opportunity to try out that 'drauflaussen' thingy that was discussed last month.

Basically, do the first 3-gallon batch and pitch the correct amount of yeast for that size.  Next day, do the second batch and, since the first batch has functioned as an additional "starter" step, there should be enough yeast now present to just run in the second batch.  Main benefit being only half as large a starter is needed.

Of course, chill that second batch before running in and, most importantly, like Keith said, control those fermentation temperatures!!

tygo:

--- Quote from: hokerer on January 13, 2013, 12:45:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: tygo on January 12, 2013, 06:38:18 PM ---But to answer your original question, if you're planning on doing them a little bit apart, I would pitch the correct amount of yeast for the whole batch into the first one.

--- End quote ---

Curious why you'd suggest this.
--- End quote ---

Like you said, a barleywine is going to require a huge amount of yeast, and given the higher OG it's not the most favorable environment for yeast growth.  My thinking is that I'd rather pitch the right amount for the whole batch to make sure I had a good population of healthy yeast in there to get the job done.

erockrph:

--- Quote from: tygo on January 14, 2013, 05:47:00 AM ---
--- Quote from: hokerer on January 13, 2013, 12:45:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: tygo on January 12, 2013, 06:38:18 PM ---But to answer your original question, if you're planning on doing them a little bit apart, I would pitch the correct amount of yeast for the whole batch into the first one.

--- End quote ---

Curious why you'd suggest this.
--- End quote ---

Like you said, a barleywine is going to require a huge amount of yeast, and given the higher OG it's not the most favorable environment for yeast growth.  My thinking is that I'd rather pitch the right amount for the whole batch to make sure I had a good population of healthy yeast in there to get the job done.

--- End quote ---

If you're going to brew this in two separate batches, you may consider taking a few pounds of grain from the first batch and adding them to the second batch instead. This way your initial batch is a bit easier on the yeast. then once they're roaring away you can hit them with the higher gravity wort (which would end up getting diluted by the initial 3 gallons).

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: erockrph on January 14, 2013, 10:49:19 AM ---
--- Quote from: tygo on January 14, 2013, 05:47:00 AM ---
--- Quote from: hokerer on January 13, 2013, 12:45:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: tygo on January 12, 2013, 06:38:18 PM ---But to answer your original question, if you're planning on doing them a little bit apart, I would pitch the correct amount of yeast for the whole batch into the first one.

--- End quote ---

Curious why you'd suggest this.
--- End quote ---

Like you said, a barleywine is going to require a huge amount of yeast, and given the higher OG it's not the most favorable environment for yeast growth.  My thinking is that I'd rather pitch the right amount for the whole batch to make sure I had a good population of healthy yeast in there to get the job done.

--- End quote ---

If you're going to brew this in two separate batches, you may consider taking a few pounds of grain from the first batch and adding them to the second batch instead. This way your initial batch is a bit easier on the yeast. then once they're roaring away you can hit them with the higher gravity wort (which would end up getting diluted by the initial 3 gallons).

--- End quote ---

I'll give a big +1 to incremental feeding. I just did a barley wine that had about 3 lbs of maple syrup as a big chunk of the fermentables so I brewed a 1.086 beer and about three or four days into the fermentation hit it with the syrup. It took off again and the final result, even though it's ~13% abv, is quite drinkable.

hokerer:

--- Quote from: tygo on January 14, 2013, 05:47:00 AM ---Like you said, a barleywine is going to require a huge amount of yeast, and given the higher OG it's not the most favorable environment for yeast growth.  My thinking is that I'd rather pitch the right amount for the whole batch to make sure I had a good population of healthy yeast in there to get the job done.

--- End quote ---

That's a valid point.  Kinda thinking along the lines that you use a relatively low gravity wort for making starters so using the first half of a barleywine would be anything but low gravity.

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