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Mead with Pomegranate Seeds and possibly blueberries

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morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: Joe Sr. on January 14, 2013, 12:27:09 PM ---Not to be a worry wart, but cherry pits contain cyanide.  Not sure about pomegranate seeds and even if they do I'm still alive so at least in low concentrations no worries.

I don't know if the cyanide would leach out into the alcohol, but it seems a safe bet some amount would.

--- End quote ---

This has been covered. and while these things do contain cyanide compounds they are not in a toxic form. Cherry pits have been used as a spice for many centuries as have pomegranite seeds. Not something that one should worry about.

kramerog:
A quick search indicates that pomegranate seeds do not contain cyanide or its precursor and are safe to eat.

Joe Sr.:

--- Quote from: morticaixavier on January 14, 2013, 12:45:02 PM ---
--- Quote from: Joe Sr. on January 14, 2013, 12:27:09 PM ---Not to be a worry wart, but cherry pits contain cyanide.  Not sure about pomegranate seeds and even if they do I'm still alive so at least in low concentrations no worries.

I don't know if the cyanide would leach out into the alcohol, but it seems a safe bet some amount would.

--- End quote ---

This has been covered. and while these things do contain cyanide compounds they are not in a toxic form. Cherry pits have been used as a spice for many centuries as have pomegranite seeds. Not something that one should worry about.

--- End quote ---

Five pounds of cherries contains far more pits than whatever amount you're using of whatever spice you're referring to.  I wouldn't do it.  Feel free to do so, if you are so inclined.

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: Joe Sr. on January 14, 2013, 12:55:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: morticaixavier on January 14, 2013, 12:45:02 PM ---
--- Quote from: Joe Sr. on January 14, 2013, 12:27:09 PM ---Not to be a worry wart, but cherry pits contain cyanide.  Not sure about pomegranate seeds and even if they do I'm still alive so at least in low concentrations no worries.

I don't know if the cyanide would leach out into the alcohol, but it seems a safe bet some amount would.

--- End quote ---

This has been covered. and while these things do contain cyanide compounds they are not in a toxic form. Cherry pits have been used as a spice for many centuries as have pomegranite seeds. Not something that one should worry about.

--- End quote ---

Five pounds of cherries contains far more pits than whatever amount you're using of whatever spice you're referring to.  I wouldn't do it.  Feel free to do so, if you are so inclined.

--- End quote ---

sure way more, the spice is mahleb or makleb or something like that by the way, but the spice is the toasted ground pits and the cherry pits in the beer are hardly consumed at all.

Let's also remember that traditional kriek is made by performing a secondary fermentation a-top HUGE amounts of whole fruit. The beer is left on the fruit for a very long time and nothing of the flesh is left when it's done. I have not seen any studies that quantify how much cyanic compounds are present in a traditional kriek but it would be interesting.

However what it comes down to is that the cyanide compounds found in cherry pits and other stone fruit stones are actually an important nutrient that we could not live well without. This doesn't mean that there is no danger in consuming it, just that in small amounts it is actually beneficial.

morticaixavier:
Well, a little googling and I get an opposing view on the whole issue.

http://www.artofdrink.com/archive/research/cyanide-in-apricot-cherries-pits/

That being said I would argue with his methodogy as he is essentially assuming that you would extract all the amygdalin from the cherry kernals, which seems unlikely if they are whole, and that it would all be converted to free HCN.

But certainly keep it in mind.

anyway, it seems it's moot in this context as we are not talking about cherries but about pomegranites which are free of amygdalin anyway.

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