General Category > Equipment and Software

propane vs natural gas

(1/5) > >>

tschmidlin:
I don't have much experience with different types of gas, but this looks like a natural gas burner to me.  And correct me if I'm wrong, but running propane through a natural gas burner will cause it to burn less completely and create extra soot which will build up on the underside of the kettle, further cutting efficiency.  Does that all sounds about right?

Can anyone help me with calculating efficiency so I can figure out the relative value (heating capacity per $) of propane vs. natural gas in my market?  I haven't looked up the prices yet, but I figure there has to be some way to compare the two.





morticaixavier:
■100,000 BTU/hr furnace will use about 97 cubic feet of natural gas (100,000 ÷ 1,030 = 97.1) in one hour
■100,000 BTU/hr furnace will use about 40 cubic feet of propane (100,000 ÷ 2516 = 39.7) in one hour

This might be what you are looking for.

http://www.propane101.com/propanevsnaturalgas.htm

VinS:
Tom does the burner have a regulator or any gas line attached to it? You could use it as propane by changing the jets if it is a gas burner.

kramerog:

--- Quote from: tschmidlin on January 14, 2013, 02:05:30 PM ---I don't have much experience with different types of gas, but this looks like a natural gas burner to me.  And correct me if I'm wrong, but running propane through a natural gas burner will cause it to burn less completely

--- End quote ---

The pictures aren't from the right perspective for me to tell if you have a natural gas or a propane burner.  The air orifices shown in the pictures are the same size for natural gas and propane.  Take a picture down the burner tip so I can see the size of the gas orifice relative to the burner tip.

Running propane through an NG burner will be tremendously inefficient and produce prodigious amounts of soot, carbon monoxide, and possibly unburned propane. Let's say you use 40 cfh of propane (100,000 BTU/hr per Morticai), the NG burner will only draw in enough air to burn 40 cfh of natural gas (~39,000 BTU/hr). 

tschmidlin:

--- Quote from: kramerog on January 14, 2013, 02:33:51 PM ---The pictures aren't from the right perspective for me to tell if you have a natural gas or a propane burner.  The air orifices shown in the pictures are the same size for natural gas and propane.  Take a picture down the burner tip so I can see the size of the gas orifice relative to the burner tip.

--- End quote ---
I tried a few perspectives, but guess I missed the important one :)  I'll try to get you the picture you want.

What if I said it burns orange no matter how low the propane is turned?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version