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Apartment Home Brewing

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euge:
Induction cooktops require that the pots attract a magnet or they won't work.

Years ago I brewed some large batches in my tiny efficiency apt by straddling two elements on an undersized electric range-top. Even now I use two gas burners and the same 80qt in the kitchen. I've boiled up to 14 gallons- it just takes about an hour to get it to boil with the lid on. Less time with 6 gallons.

Brewing anywhere inside also requires good ventilation and airflow. Hopefully one will have a hood vent that communicates outside so the steam has somewhere to go. It would be near-raining in my efficiency...

Ultimately I'd like to get an all-electric system where I could just set everything on the stove and use my fabulous vent hood to evacuate the steam.

I say keep with your current setup if you don't mind steeping and dilution (topping up concentrated wort with water). I've never minded it and have made some fabulous beers by going that route. If you feel like scaling up your system at some point we can all help you with that. If you feel the need for some capital outlay then my recommendation is to first get you some fermentation temperature control for this summer before buying any new kettles or kegging setups.

Right now it is brewing weather here in Texas. That will soon change.

AmandaK:

--- Quote from: euge on January 20, 2013, 10:15:27 AM ---Brewing anywhere inside also requires good ventilation and airflow. Hopefully one will have a hood vent that communicates outside so the steam has somewhere to go. It would be near-raining in my efficiency...

--- End quote ---

During the winter, my windows drip with condensation. I just crack 'em open and carry on!  ;D

duncan:
I, too, suffer from a case of the s***ty-apartment-electric-range and also came down with a nasty bout of the I-am-broke-at-the-moments. Turkey fryer is sort of the assumed next step, but propane can get expensive if you brew frequently and on top of that I am not allowed to have propane on my rental property. Induction place was my next thought, but I could only power 120v and the cheapest one was over $100. Then I found out about heat sticks...

You can build yourself a heat stick for about $30, but you're always flirting with danger when building homemade submersible electronics. I didn't have too much electrical experience before building mine, but I followed some directions I found online to the tee and it is still safely functioning ~10 batches later. I wouldn't go down this road unless you're 100% confident in your work. One mistake could potentially be fatal. (PSA: *ALWAYS AND ONLY USE A GFCI OUTLET*). That is my safety spiel, proceed at your own risk...

I built two heat sticks (120v, 1500w) for about $50 (I only use one at a time; one for back up). They get my 3 gal batch pre-boil volumes (~5 gal) from mash temps to boil in about 15 minutes with the help of my good-for-nothin' range. I haven't tried it with ~7 gal boil yet for 5 gal batches, but I have a second GFCI outlet in my kitchen and I'd just throw two heat sticks in if one wasn't hacking it. For $50, you are getting a hell of a deal. BUT AGAIN!!!! This can be DEADLY if built incorrectly. Be Smart. Befriend an electrician ;)

-d

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