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First all-grain, help me make a SMaSH APA recipe?

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anje:
Honestly, I'm really hoping I don't have to obsess about water too much, but it might not be possible given the fact that I like IPAs and APAs and live where I do. Diluting with RO and going with it seems a lot more my speed, and requires less hauling than buying all RO and adding back minerals.

Then again, in my experience, locally made stouts and porters tend to taste great, while the paler hoppy stuff comes across as harsh.

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: anje on January 17, 2013, 02:17:39 PM ---Honestly, I'm really hoping I don't have to obsess about water too much, but it might not be possible given the fact that I like IPAs and APAs and live where I do. Diluting with RO and going with it seems a lot more my speed, and requires less hauling than buying all RO and adding back minerals.

Then again, in my experience, locally made stouts and porters tend to taste great, while the paler hoppy stuff comes across as harsh.

--- End quote ---

It's not that much work, you can keep it pretty simple, Three 'powders' and one acid.

I like Gypsum (calcium sulfate), Calcium Chloride, Pickling lime, and lactic acid (because that is what they had when I was as the LHBS, others prefer other acids)

Download bru'n water and set it up for 100% dillution with RO and save it that way.

I generally add a few grams of calcium chloride and a few of calcium sulfate to the mash and pickling lime only with really dark beers like stouts and lactic acid only with really light beers like kolsch. You can adjust the ratio of sufate to choloride by adjusting the relative amounts of each while getting all the calcium you will need. I do not own a pH meter and have not seen any issues just relying on martin's calculations from 'standard' RO numbers. If I was adding the complication of adding any % of the local water it would be to much for me.

davidgzach:
IMHO-If this is your first all-grain, I would not worry about water, PH or ANYTHING except dialing in my temperature and remembering to do all the steps correctly.  RDWHAHB.

Unless your water is coming straight from the sewer, you will make beer if your process is sound and probably good beer at that.  I'm no chemist or water expert, but I do not see anything on your report that jumps out and says "this will make horrible beer!"  Does it taste good out of the faucet?

As for the dark grain, I would add .25-.5 pounds of Crystal 40 to that SMaSH and go with it!  A Cascade Pale Ale is a great first recipe idea and one that will probably taste great with a few blemishes in your process (and some slightly less than perfect water).

Enjoy your first all-grain and keep it simple!  And RDWHAHB!   8)

Dave

alcaponejunior:
my first all grain batch was a maris otter / willamette SMaSH with us-05.  full details at link.  it came out good, but not what I expected.  I'd like to re-make it with cascade and 2-row, that sounds good!

anje:
Well, I did it. Not exactly a SMaSH -- decided to throw some crystal in there for color/flavor/acid. I'll probably start monkeying with water chemistry in a few brews.

What have I learned?
(1) Hitting temperatures when it's 33F where you're working is kinda tricky. (Glad I didn't do it last weekend when it was more like 12F.  But chilling worked great!)
(2) I used too much water. My efficiency might actually have been OK if I measured it, but everything came out a bit dilute.
(3) My cooler keeps grains untouchably hot after the sparge is drained for several hours. But it takes a LOT to get it warmed up.

Can anyone link me to a quick tutorial on how to tune the temperatures needed to heat a mash tun? Even with preheating, my strike water temp wasn't even close at first. The thing weighs about 17lbs, for what it's worth.

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