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Add Extract DURING a Mini-Mash to use the Enzymes?

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dmtaylor:
I am normally an all-grain brewer, but at the request of a friend, recently I came up with an extract/mini-mash recipe for Bud Light.  And then I was thinking, I might actually want to give this recipe a try in my own house, as it is just crazy enough that it might actually work.  And I want this beer to be as dry as possible, no residual sweetness to speak of, just like the real Bud Light.  All distilled water would be used, maybe even a little acid to help bring the mash pH down.  However, I also know that the various extracts in the market today have different attenuability depending on which manufacturer, i.e., some extracts won't ferment down below 1.018, no matter what you do or how much simple sugar or adjuncts you add or whatever.  But.... what if it were possible to level this playing field?  What if you could use ANY manufacturer's extract and still get reasonably consistent results in regards to high attenuation (goal would be 1.010 or less).  Since this is a mini-mash beer, what would happen if you used the following process?:

1) Steep a pound of crushed 6-row malt in a bag (mini-BIAB) in about 3 quarts of water at 147 F for 75 minutes.
2) Pull the bag out, but while the enzymes are still active, add all your extract, ensure it is all dissolved, and also let THAT sit at 147 F for another ~20 minutes.  A small amount of heat will need to be added to bring temperature up, but since there's only 3 quarts of sweet wort at this point, this is not difficult at all.
3) After "mashing" the extract for ~20 minutes using the dissolved enzymes from the grain, add all the rest of your brewing water (total of 6 gallons), bring up to a boil, and brew as normal (5 gallon recipe).

The theory is that the high enzymatic content of the 6-row will be plenty to break down any complex sugars that may be in the extract -- you could extend the extract "mash" to an hour or more if you wanted the beer to be as dry as possible, but my guess is 20 minutes would suffice.  Then add your water and brew as normal.

I have a feeling this will work, and I kind of want to try it.  What do the other all-grain mashing experts think?  Has anyone else tried anything similar to this process before?  How did it turn out??

tygo:
I did this with a partial mash pilsner that i have lagering right now. It finished at 1.010. I don't know where i would have ended up if i hadn't done it though.

davidgzach:
I thought the process of making the DME or LME denatured all of the enzymes.  Am I mistaken on this?

Dave 

hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: davidgzach on January 19, 2013, 06:58:41 AM ---I thought the process of making the DME or LME denatured all of the enzymes.  Am I mistaken on this?

Dave

--- End quote ---

I think you are correct. But adding the extract to the mini-mash has potential to dry out the beer.

davidgzach:

--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on January 19, 2013, 07:01:36 AM ---
--- Quote from: davidgzach on January 19, 2013, 06:58:41 AM ---I thought the process of making the DME or LME denatured all of the enzymes.  Am I mistaken on this?

Dave

--- End quote ---

I think you are correct. But adding the extract to the mini-mash has potential to dry out the beer.

--- End quote ---

OK, I get it now!   :o  Thanks Jeff.

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