Author Topic: Welding Information.  (Read 4822 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2010, 08:08:40 PM »
They are all made in China. Or they are "assembled" here with parts made in China.

Anti spatter spray works well but makes terrible fumes. Look for some nozzle dip. It works great for keeping the cup and tip clean. Also you can brush some on parts that you dont want to get all spattery. You can easily remove spatter by scrapping with a wide chisels or piece of quarter inch flat bar or something like that. Should come right off.

If you use shielding gas you will get a much cleaner looking weld but if you use flux core wire you will get a spattery weld but you will get greater penetration and a stronger weld.

So, how long do you think it will take till you are ready to install custom railings and stairs?
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2010, 11:11:06 PM »

So, how long do you think it will take till you are ready to install custom railings and stairs?

Oh, give me at least a week.  ;) Let me know when you're working out in this part of the world, I'm currently available. If not for welding I can at least show you a couple of dives to eat and drink at.

So it's not so much anti spatter - it's just like rain-x for your welding area.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2010, 11:15:02 PM by beerocd »
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Offline dean

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2010, 06:17:07 AM »
I bought a MIG welder back in 2007 and finally fired it up only a couple weeks ago.  I had fun, until then I had only welded maybe a total of an hour in my life.  I was a QE for building code boilers and pressure vessels so I learned a lot but never was allowed to do any welding... it was a union shop.  Saw some truely awesome welds as well as the welders themselves, there is definitely a corelation between years of experience and quality of work.  :D

Anyway, I seem to have a problem with trailing off... its hard to follow the joint without going to one side or the other.  I have a auto-darkening shield but I still can't see the joint sometimes.  First I had it set for TIG but switched it to MIG and I think I can see better but maybe not.  Which setting is best and is there anything I can or should be doing?

Oh... yeh... I went and bought some more steel for whatever project I might want to do next.   ::)  ;D

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2010, 06:58:32 AM »
If you are welding thinner stuff on the lower end of the amperage setting you can get away with a 10 shade setting. If its thicker and the amperage setting is on the higher end you have to go darker. 11 or 12. Welding sheet metal with mig you can go as low as 8. But be careful if you feel any discomfort turn it darker.

Also get some soap stone and then mark the joint heavily by rubbing it into and along the joint. This will make a white line on both sides of the joint so you can see it better. Soap stone will not contaminate the weld.
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Offline gwilkosz

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2010, 07:06:24 AM »
Thanks for all of the information.  I've been considering buying a welder and trying my hand at building a brewing sculpture.  Before I read this thread, I figured I'd get a welder at Harbor Freight Tools, but now I feel that they're probably not of a good enough quality. 

Would any of the 115 Vac MIG welders at the following link do the job for building a stainless rig?

http://www.harborfreight.com/welding/mig-flux-welders.html

Offline dean

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2010, 07:38:58 AM »
Thanks Cap.   :)  The soap stone had totally slipped my mind, and I also didn't know that it helped light the way so to speak.   8)  I've got 1/8" angle and some 22 gage sheet metal I just picked up, all mild steel and I'm using flux core so it pretty much welds itself rather than relying on any or my skills... 50 amp setting, slow wire feed and travel til I get used to it more.  It sticks sometimes, less now than when I started but I'm still learning so I have to cut the end every so often.  But I do get that nice frying bacon / crackling sound 90% of the time.   ;D

I have the setting as dark as it will go, I guess I should turn it down/up a bit and try it.  I honestly thought the torch setting controlled that setting too so I left it.   ::)  :-[   Shows you how much I know!   ItsFUN... I can see more little projects coming up in the future.   ;D

Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2010, 08:21:13 AM »
Thanks for all of the information.  I've been considering buying a welder and trying my hand at building a brewing sculpture.  Before I read this thread, I figured I'd get a welder at Harbor Freight Tools, but now I feel that they're probably not of a good enough quality. 

Would any of the 115 Vac MIG welders at the following link do the job for building a stainless rig?

http://www.harborfreight.com/welding/mig-flux-welders.html

I got the kit I did, because by the time I added helmet, gloves, brush/hammer, extra wire spool, guages.... the cost starts to really creep up on you. Mine is just a "high end" (ha ha) Campbell Hausfield. Also, I have some aluminum I wanted to weld, can't do that with the hundred dollar buzz box they were selling (need DC) - so I also paid for future abilities too. A <$50 kit and a bottle of argon will get me going on the aluminum.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2010, 12:28:58 PM »
I never tried any of those welders from Harbor Freight but I do know some welders who use them for their businesses.They say they work fine. Not sure if it is any of those models though. They claim that (and I tend to agree) that the cost of these welders is the same price that it would cost to repair a Miller or Esab welder. So if one breaks down it is easily and afford ably replaced.

In theory you should be able to weld stainless with them and at 115 volts you can most likely weld up to an 1/8" thickness. 

Maybe Lonnie will chime in with more info on welding stainless with MIG. I am more of  TIG guy and I dont have much experience welding SS with MIG.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2010, 08:07:14 AM »
Anybody ever use the Superior number 9 or any other backing flux instead back purging SS welds?

Working on a bunch of brewing vessels this week.

I was thinking of trying this stuff.

Im also trying to figure out a way to back purge without running a second tank of argon, Maybe some kind of dual fitting from one regulator? Those dual regulators are not cheap.

I want to find away to reduce gear so to be in and out of a job site fast.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 08:10:20 AM by capozzoli »
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #24 on: June 27, 2010, 03:30:42 PM »

Im also trying to figure out a way to back purge without running a second tank of argon, Maybe some kind of dual fitting from one regulator? Those dual regulators are not cheap.

Harbor freight has some cheap aluminum manifolds.

Not sure why this wouldn't work for you. crack valve on the back side to trickle the gas, run front side full open. Obviously you need valves along with this, but I think it'd work. Did I mention I know NOTHING about welding?  :-\
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #25 on: June 27, 2010, 04:46:29 PM »
Pretty cool. That may do the trick. I imagine I would have to fit one hole with a flow meter and the other with a hose for the back purge.

The back purge does not need to be regulated, especially with kettles, just cove them with a towel and fill them with gas. The positive flow from the hose will keep it full.

I wonder though if the loss of pressure form have two lines will effect the gas pressure needed at the flow meter?

Its definitely worth a look. Im gonna get one and try.

I love Harbor Freight. They will keep you going (barely) till you find the right tool for the job.



 
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Offline richardt

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2010, 05:03:24 PM »
What is the deal with Aluminum vs SS?

I like how Aluminum doesn't rust--is it cheaper?
Is it harder to weld?

I know it transfers heat really well (ask me how I know!)


Offline Matt B

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #27 on: June 27, 2010, 07:02:49 PM »
I think aluminum is cheaper than stainless, and it is harder to weld. For the most part, TIG's your only real option with aluminum. Even then, you've got to clean off the aluminum oxide layer before welding, because that has a higher melting point than the underlying aluminum. And TIG is definitely more difficult than MIG welding.

I'm not sure how the different aluminum alloys compare with structural rigidity, depending on what you're doing with it, this might be important (building a sculpture, etc.)

For kettles and the like, you'd have to find aluminum couplers or clover fittings to weld to your aluminum pot, and I admit I haven't seen these. Stainless is a far more common substance when it comes to this type of equipment.


Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2010, 07:40:21 PM »
I think aluminum is cheaper than stainless, and it is harder to weld. For the most part, TIG's your only real option with aluminum.


I only need a $50 kit for my mig in order to be able to do aluminum. Well, that and a bottle of argon.
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Offline Matt B

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2010, 08:11:27 PM »
Yeah, my MIG is theoretically capable of doing aluminum as well, I just haven't tried it. I have my doubts as to how well it'll work. Gotta flip the direction of the current, I think you can really only do it with 240v welders (could be wrong there) and few other odd things. However, I want to get a TIG regardless :)