Author Topic: Mozzarella  (Read 5658 times)

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2013, 06:11:41 AM »
My second batch was a phenomenal failure. I got all ricotta. I'm sure the milk was overpasteurized.  The third was going well but I was trying to stir less to make a wetter, softer mozzarella. I think I overheated the curds. I haven't tried since.
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Offline Delo

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2013, 08:07:25 AM »
I forgot about this thread. I've made some mozzarella a handful of times, not as much as I thought I would, and for some reason the first time had been the best. I had large curds that were easily separated and it was very easy.  The second time was all ricotta. The rest have been varying degrees of curd size but I always was able to get mozzarella.  In some of the batches, I would have a fair amount of whey to separate out each time I heated the curds and it looked like I would get only ricotta like cheese, but it worked out.  For me some of it may be a patience thing, but I think a lot of it is ph.  The recipe I use also calls for less citric acid, 1 tsp and also no CaCl2.  I've used organic pasturized, not ultrapasturized, milk from Wegmans for every batch. The 2 tsp may be for raw milk.  From what I read the curds dont form as well if the pH is too low.

I also got some ricotta after making the mozzarella by heating and straining. It wasn't a lot but it was worth it.

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2013, 08:11:51 AM »
Don't post a lot (obviously), but learn a ton from you guys.

I've used AHS Mozz kit a bunch, and early on experienced similar results. After taking a look at http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html and doing some reading, I think the AHS formula was very slightly overaccidifying my milk. First, I got rid of the CaCl2 as many recipes don't call for it. Then, I backed the acid down to 1 and 3/8 tsp in trial and error over several batches. The result was a really tight curd formation and really stretchy, moist mozz. Might be worth a quick try before seeking out more milk--my milk was really similar to your description.

Thanks a million! This is really helpful info for me. I was wondering if the CaCl was doing more harm than good, but I don't know if I would have looked to check the citric acid quantity. I don't think I'll be waiting too long to try this again since the cheese is so good. I'm wondering if my yield will improve on the ricotta as well if I get better results on the curd.

I'll be sure to update how the next batch comes out. Next time I might cut the unhomogenized whole milk 50:50 with skim to keep the calorie content down.
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2014, 09:18:53 PM »
I just made my second batch of mozz last night and thought I'd post a little update. Dropping the CaCl2 and cutting back on the acid made a huge difference this time around. I got a much tighter curd that stayed afloat so I could fish it all out easily. I didn't weigh my yield, but by eyeball it seems like I got more mozz and a bit less ricotta this time around.

I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2014, 08:20:44 AM »
I just made my second batch of mozz last night and thought I'd post a little update. Dropping the CaCl2 and cutting back on the acid made a huge difference this time around. I got a much tighter curd that stayed afloat so I could fish it all out easily. I didn't weigh my yield, but by eyeball it seems like I got more mozz and a bit less ricotta this time around.

I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2014, 06:21:19 PM »
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2014, 06:45:43 PM »
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D

As long as you bring beer, we're cool :)
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2014, 07:23:29 PM »
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D

As long as you bring beer, we're cool :)
Which is a perfect transition to ... you live in Chepachet? My father-in-law owns The Old Post Office, an antique store in 'downtown' Chepachet (in the old post office building as a matter of fact).
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #38 on: January 24, 2014, 08:27:02 AM »
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #39 on: January 24, 2014, 09:12:12 AM »
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.

Would this be similar to Boursin if herbed-up?
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #40 on: January 24, 2014, 09:30:54 AM »
Which is a perfect transition to ... you live in Chepachet? My father-in-law owns The Old Post Office, an antique store in 'downtown' Chepachet (in the old post office building as a matter of fact).

Small world! I'm right around the corner from there. I've never done the whole antiquing thing downtown, but I've always meant to go check it out.
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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2014, 06:12:38 PM »
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.

Would this be similar to Boursin if herbed-up?

Absolutely. Boursin is another great example. Though, perhaps fromage frais would be a better classification since the cheese is still "alive". I use pasteurized whole organic milk to which a culture is added and fermented for 16+ hours. Then drain in the morning and hang via cheesecloth in the evening (sometimes overnight again) and then salt and package when the consistency is correct.

My foray into making hard cheese was very educational and ultimately a complete fail. I couldn't combat the mold effectively enough and my precious six week old Jack-cheese was run through with deadly looking black mold. Went into the trash.




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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #42 on: January 24, 2014, 10:30:44 PM »
Damn... my waistline can't afford to get too heavy into cheesemaking as a hobby right now, but I'm starting to get hooked. I've had success with mozz, ricotta and paneer now, and fromage blanc sounds right up my alley. It also helps that I have a dairy nearby that has some delicious milk.
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Offline Jeff M

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2014, 04:33:12 PM »
Damn... my waistline can't afford to get too heavy into cheesemaking as a hobby right now, but I'm starting to get hooked. I've had success with mozz, ricotta and paneer now, and fromage blanc sounds right up my alley. It also helps that I have a dairy nearby that has some delicious milk.

Sounds like Tha Danga Zone! to me ;)
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Offline el_capitan

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Re: Mozzarella
« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2014, 07:57:54 PM »
Oh Jeez, I knew I shouldn't have clicked on this thread!

I made a couple batches of mozzarella a few years ago, and did the ricotta trick with the whey too.  It was a cool process. 

Some friends down the road from us raise grass-fed beef and sell us raw milk when we want it.  My wife makes kefir with it, which is phenomenal.  The lady makes a whole selection of cheeses and sells at farmer's markets around the area.  She offered to let me sit in on a batch and see what's involved in large-scale home cheesemaking.  She also offered to sell me some beginner's stainless equipment that her husband fabricated, before she moved up to large batches. 

I just barely restrained myself.  I figure it's best to wait a few years until our kids are a bit older before I dive into another hobby.  I'm hoping to involve them in the learning process too.  Ideally, I'd like to have a couple dairy goats and maybe a jersey cow.  The hobby farm is still a ways off, but we're working our way towards it. 

It's cool to be part of a community here of DIY-minded people.  You're making me want to get some molds and cultures and get going! 
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