General Category > Beer Recipes

Hopslam Clone?

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mypenguin:
I made an extract Hopslam clone back in September and it was awesome.  I did a BIAB version about 3 weeks ago of it and am bottling it this weekend.  I searched the web for clone recipes for quite a while and stumbled upon this one and it seemed to make the most sense to me for some reason.  So no, this isn't mine, but I did make it.

Extract:
Hopslam Clone Extract Recipe 5 gal

10 lbs light extract 
3 lbs honey @ flameout  (the original recipe I copied this from called for 4lbs, but that seemed like too much)
Steeping grains- 1 lb Aromatic
2 paks yeast Safale US-05
.............................
Steep grains for 45 minutes. then add DME and start the boil.

Hop Schedule:

1 Simcoe 75
1 cascade 60
2 centennial 10
1 cascade 5
1 vanguard flameout
1 amarillo flameout
1 hallertau flameout
2 simcoe dry

For the all grain, I changed it to
12Lb 2-row
1Lb aromatic
3lbs of honey
same hop schedule.
same yeast.

Took about 3 weeks to get the carbonation in the bottle, but it was great, probably my best beer I have made.  Excited to see what the all grain version is like since it was about 50% cheaper.


mypenguin:
I did a side by side last night with a bottle of mine (in the bottle 2.5 weeks) and a hopslam on tap.  Mine was sweeter up front, especially when cold but as they warmed up a little they became very close to being the same beer.  The color was dead on.  I may drop a little honey next time and use some honey malt instead and see what that does for the up front sweetness.  Just letting you know how my first all grain recipe for that clone worked out.   

Mark G:

--- Quote from: mypenguin on March 14, 2013, 07:43:19 AM ---I did a side by side last night with a bottle of mine (in the bottle 2.5 weeks) and a hopslam on tap.  Mine was sweeter up front, especially when cold but as they warmed up a little they became very close to being the same beer.  The color was dead on.  I may drop a little honey next time and use some honey malt instead and see what that does for the up front sweetness.  Just letting you know how my first all grain recipe for that clone worked out.   

--- End quote ---
You probably want to do the opposite actually, and add more honey if you want it to finish a bit drier. Honey is almost completely fermentable, so will make the beer less sweet once it ferments out. Honey malt will leave additional residual sweetness.

mypenguin:

--- Quote from: mypenguin on March 14, 2013, 07:43:19 AM ---I did a side by side last night with a bottle of mine (in the bottle 2.5 weeks) and a hopslam on tap.  Mine was sweeter up front, especially when cold but as they warmed up a little they became very close to being the same beer.  The color was dead on.  I may drop a little honey next time and use some honey malt instead and see what that does for the up front sweetness.  Just letting you know how my first all grain recipe for that clone worked out.   

--- End quote ---

The up front sweetness did diminish after a few more weeks in the bottle.  I entered this in my first homebrew competition recently and it won the Pale Ale category, and runner up for best in show.  Just throwing that out there.  Now I need to find the original post I got the recipe from and thank that guy.

jeffy:

--- Quote from: mypenguin on April 24, 2013, 11:52:39 AM ---
--- Quote from: mypenguin on March 14, 2013, 07:43:19 AM ---I did a side by side last night with a bottle of mine (in the bottle 2.5 weeks) and a hopslam on tap.  Mine was sweeter up front, especially when cold but as they warmed up a little they became very close to being the same beer.  The color was dead on.  I may drop a little honey next time and use some honey malt instead and see what that does for the up front sweetness.  Just letting you know how my first all grain recipe for that clone worked out.   

--- End quote ---

The up front sweetness did diminish after a few more weeks in the bottle.  I entered this in my first homebrew competition recently and it won the Pale Ale category, and runner up for best in show.  Just throwing that out there.  Now I need to find the original post I got the recipe from and thank that guy.

--- End quote ---

Congratulations, but doesn't that look a little strong to be in the Pale Ale category?  What was the original gravity?

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