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My First Batch Sparge

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malzig:

--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on February 25, 2013, 07:20:06 PM ---Denny must be right on this.  It runs counter to the concept of lower mash temp getting more fermentables, generally, but it has been my experience, as well.

--- End quote ---
Don't confuse getting more extract with getting a more fermentable wort.  Higher mash temperatures will often yield more sugars sooner (both fermentable and nonfermentable, potentially yielding a higher OG) than lower mash temperatures, but the cooler mash will usually be more fermentable (it will finish at a lower gravity from the same OG).

ynotbrusum:

--- Quote from: malzig on February 26, 2013, 04:44:16 AM ---
--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on February 25, 2013, 07:20:06 PM ---Denny must be right on this.  It runs counter to the concept of lower mash temp getting more fermentables, generally, but it has been my experience, as well.

--- End quote ---
Don't confuse getting more extract with getting a more fermentable wort.  Higher mash temperatures will often yield more sugars sooner (both fermentable and nonfermentable, potentially yielding a higher OG) than lower mash temperatures, but the cooler mash will usually be more fermentable (it will finish at a lower gravity from the same OG).

--- End quote ---

I appreciate that, but the fact is it did yield more fermentables, too, because the FG was lower, as well.

denny:

--- Quote from: malzig on February 26, 2013, 04:44:16 AM ---
--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on February 25, 2013, 07:20:06 PM ---Denny must be right on this.  It runs counter to the concept of lower mash temp getting more fermentables, generally, but it has been my experience, as well.

--- End quote ---
Don't confuse getting more extract with getting a more fermentable wort.  Higher mash temperatures will often yield more sugars sooner (both fermentable and nonfermentable, potentially yielding a higher OG) than lower mash temperatures, but the cooler mash will usually be more fermentable (it will finish at a lower gravity from the same OG).

--- End quote ---

I have not experienced any change in fermentability by sparging with hotter water.  It's a good theory, but I haven't seen it in practice.

ynotbrusum:
Maybe I can replicate it, again.  It may have been a slightly different variable of another kind that I didn't account for (they were successive batches of the same lager).  Maybe even generational yeast differences had an effect?

dordway29:
Hotter sparge water will "loosen" your mash as well more effectively dissolve the sugars into your wort. I'm sure your mash efficiency was about the same but what I call "sparge potential" can change with the temperature of your sparge, as well as the length of your sparge. Be careful with hotter sparges though, you can also pull some unwanted flavors into your kettle. If you lower the ph of your sparge water using either phosphoric acid or even lactic acid you can avoid this.

To increase efficiency on higher gravity beers you can batch sparge longer and then boil longer. Works well for barleywines and such.

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