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Why does all my beer taste the same?

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euge:

--- Quote from: jackhorzempa on February 05, 2013, 11:16:17 AM ---I just read the title of “Why does all my beer taste the same?” and the first thought that popped into my mind was: I bet he is using the same yeast strain. It is not too uncommon to go the a brewpub and several of the beers will taste similar (e.g., a Blonde Ale and a light Amber Ale for example). It is common for a brewpub to have a ‘house’ yeast for their ales and consequently unless there is a substantial difference in the grist of their beers they will taste similar.

Cheers!

--- End quote ---

This was my thought as well.

mtnrockhopper:

--- Quote from: jackhorzempa on February 05, 2013, 11:16:17 AM ---I just read the title of “Why does all my beer taste the same?” and the first thought that popped into my mind was: I bet he is using the same yeast strain. It is not too uncommon to go the a brewpub and several of the beers will taste similar (e.g., a Blonde Ale and a light Amber Ale for example). It is common for a brewpub to have a ‘house’ yeast for their ales and consequently unless there is a substantial difference in the grist of their beers they will taste similar.

Cheers!

--- End quote ---
Also, if all three kits use the same brand amber or dark extract, then they would have very similar grain bills.

mpietropaoli:

--- Quote from: awfenske on February 05, 2013, 08:02:20 AM ---I started brewing recently and have made three batches from extract kits (details below). I had a little experience before this in helping my dad make mead and wine, so I at least had a clue when I started. I sanitized and followed all directions religiously, and I ended up with three beers that should taste pretty different from each other but all taste incredibly similar. There are no off-flavors. The aroma is very nice on all of them, and the color, head, etc. all look right. OG and FG were exactly where the instructions specified. But they all have a very thin flavor profile and/or seem overcarbonated, with only subtle notes of the beer's intended flavor.

#1) Brewer's Best Scottish Ale, OG 1.034, boil volume 2.5gal
#2) Midwest Supplies Hex Nut Brown Ale, OG 1.043, boil volume 5gal
#3) Midwest Supplies Irish Stout, OG 1.047, boil volume 3gal

After the first one came out thin but with everything else seemingly on-target, I figured I needed to steep the specialty grains for longer (30 minutes on batches 2 and 3 compared to 20 on batch 1), which resulted in little to no improvement. All three seemed to have a much fuller flavor just before bottling compared to after bottle conditioning - going into the bottles each batch tasted great, and all three notably different from each other as they should be, but after 2 weeks in the bottle they all taste very similar and seem to have lost their flavor. There might be a tiny improvement in the flavor after extra time in the bottles (a month or two), but it's small enough that I could just be fooling myself.

I'm using secondary fermentation (roughly a week in the primary and a week in the secondary), bottle conditioning with the 3/4 cup of priming sugar that is included in the kits, and the fermentation/carbonation temperature is around 65F.

I'm stumped.

--- End quote ---

what about serving temp?  34* makes all beer taste cold then bitter!  take them out of the fridge 10 min before pouring them and report back.

awfenske:
Wow, that is all incredibly helpful information. The comments about similarities in yeast and malt extracts make sense, but I don't think they are at the core of this problem because these three beers each tasted great and different from each other before going into the bottle. Drinking it a little warmer does let a tiny bit more of the flavor out, but it's still nowhere near what it tasted like before bottling. After comparing the priming sugar calculators that were posted on this topic, I know I'm overcarbing. The companies that make these kits measure everything out in such precise quantities and provide such specific directions, it really surprises me that they just throw in 5oz of corn sugar for every kit (and the directions say to use it all, in all three kits) when that is evidently not a good practice. For the Midwest Supplies Irish Stout, for 2.1 volumes in 5 gallons at 65F I should have added only 3.23-3.45oz of corn sugar rather than 5oz. Ouch.


Really wish I'd have learned all this before I overcarbed 150 bottles of beer. I guess I'll just have to go make 150 more the right way.Thanks for all of your input!

euge:
You could have a low grade infection from wild yeast which will strip the flavor from the beer and amp up the carbonation without the bottles becoming gushers.   

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