General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

yeast starter temperature and gravity

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DW:
In "How to Brew" Palmer states that you should make your starter to match the conditions of your intended batch fermentation (gravity and temperature), but in "Brewing Classic Styles" the authors state that the OG of the starter should be 1.03-1.04, and temperature for lagers should be a little less than 70 degrees.  How to make sense of this?

davidgzach:
IME, when you make a starter, you are making yeast, not beer.  Room temperature is fine for lager yeast as well.  Most starters are in the 1.035-1.040 range.  What version of HTB do you have?

Dave

jackhorzempa:
Below is from Jamil Zainasheff’s article Making a Starter (Zymurgy March/April 2007).

Q: IF I’M MAKING A HIGH GRAVITY BEER, SHOULDN’T I MAKE A HIGH GRAVITY STARTER SO THE YEAST BECOME ACCLIMATED?

No. In general, starter wort should be between 1.020 and 1.040 (5–10 °P). Lower gravity starters are easier on the yeast, but result in less growth. High gravity starters result in more growth, but are more stressful for the yeast. Logsdon says, “Generally, you’d use the lower end of that range [1.020 SG, 5 °P] for coming off a plate or slant or very old yeast. Yeast don’t get used to a high gravity environment, and the high osmotic pressure can really stress the yeast.”


I would recommend that you download the article; lots of good information in there.


Cheers!

Jimmy K:
I'd say the BCS info is the more current method.

kylekohlmorgen:

--- Quote from: mtnrockhopper on February 06, 2013, 12:09:50 PM ---I'd say the BCS info is the more current method.

--- End quote ---

+1

This method is echoed in "Yeast"

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