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Does mashing for a light or full body beer affect the efficiency?

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woodlandbrew:

--- Quote from: dmtaylor on February 09, 2013, 11:39:15 PM ---Others might beg to differ, but in my experience...

Mash temperature has negligible effect on efficiency.  Ditto for mash time.  Ditto for water to grain ratio (i.e., qts/lb).  If you mash in some water at 148 to 154 F for 40+ minutes, you're going to make beer at an efficiency that is mostly affected only by the extent of the crush.  Beyond the crush, very little matters.

My experience.  YMMV... but I doubt it.

--- End quote ---
This has been my experience as well.  60 minute or 90 minute seems to provide the same conversion efficiency for the most part.  To get a more fermentable mash, low temperatures and (perhaps to a lesser degree) long times seem to help.

Crush is king when it comes to conversion efficiency.  When it comes to laugtering efficiency it seems mostly driven by the amount of water collected compared to the amount of water added to the mash.

See here for details:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/2013/01/mash-temperature-theory.html

repo:

--- Quote from: dmtaylor on February 09, 2013, 11:39:15 PM ---Others might beg to differ, but in my experience...

Mash temperature has negligible effect on efficiency.  Ditto for mash time.  Ditto for water to grain ratio (i.e., qts/lb).  If you mash in some water at 148 to 154 F for 40+ minutes, you're going to make beer at an efficiency that is mostly affected only by the extent of the crush.  Beyond the crush, very little matters.

My experience.  YMMV... but I doubt it.

--- End quote ---

Here are some experiments which came to some different conclusions. I have found them helpful and consistent with my experience.
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Effects_of_mash_parameters_on_fermentability_and_efficiency_in_single_infusion_mashing#Mash_thickness

denny:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on February 10, 2013, 06:29:05 AM ---+ 1 for everything Dave mentions, excepting that runoff time is the next most important variable after crush.  Those two factors are what I feel are the most important for efficiency.

--- End quote ---

Unless you're batch sparging, in which case runoff speed makes no difference.

Dave, I found that my efficiency went up 2-3 points on a consistent basis when I increased my mash ratio from 1.33 qt./lb. to 1.65-75.

malzig:
Mash efficiency tends to be higher for mashes performed at the high end of the range over the low end.  This is probably due to improved starch gelatinization at higher temperatures, but might also be affected by greater enzyme activity at higher temperatures.  It's a balance with enzyme denaturation, but chemical reactions occur more rapidly as temperature increases.  Both of these factors become less of a factor with a finer crush and a higher water to grain ratio.

Kaiser:
At lower mash temp efficiency can suffer.but that can be compensated for by mashing longer or addition of a higher temp mash step.

Kai

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