Author Topic: Oak a Chocolate Imperial Stout  (Read 744 times)

Offline dking3

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Oak a Chocolate Imperial Stout
« on: February 12, 2013, 09:27:28 AM »
I’m considering oaking my Chocolate Imperial Stout.  I have 6 oz. of Light toast American White Oak.  Do you think the chocolate and oak flavors would be OK together?  The beer is finished, after 3 weeks in the primary, 9% ABV, I probably should rack it before oaking for a couple weeks, right?  I'm thinking about toasting the oak to about a medium level before using it, which would sanitize it, too.  Thanks, see you all in Philly in June.
 
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Offline snowtiger87

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Re: Oak a Chocolate Imperial Stout
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 04:29:24 PM »
If you get any vanilla out of the oak I think it would work well. 2 weeks aging would be the minimum. Just taste it and remove the oak when it tastes how you want it.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Oak a Chocolate Imperial Stout
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2013, 08:44:49 AM »
If you get any vanilla out of the oak I think it would work well. 2 weeks aging would be the minimum. Just taste it and remove the oak when it tastes how you want it.

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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Oak a Chocolate Imperial Stout
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2013, 10:57:32 AM »
With oak and stouts, I think less about the flavors that work together (because they most often do) and think about the flavors that may clash.

For instance - if your stout has an assertive roasty flavor (on the high end of the style, almost astringent), then heavily toasted oak may make the beer overly astringent. Go with light or medium toasted oak instead.

FWIW - I think medium toasted french oak is a solid choice for most oak-aged beers. Just buy the stuff thats already toasted so you don't have to worry about over toasting or unevenly toasting. Sanitize by boiling it in a few changes of water.
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