General Category > Beer Recipes

Is this a Blond or Saison?

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garc_mall:
I agree with all of the above.

I think also that brewers friend my have labeled this a saison because of the very low final gravity. AFAIK, blondes usually finish in the 1.010-1.014 range.

majorvices:
Saison has a very specific yeast character. Also, saisoins should be highly attenuated. Belgian strains are very attenuative but saison strains in particular are even more so. All that said, saison is probably the loosest style on the planet.

reverseapachemaster:
If you think of saison as a style, then you really need one of the strains that produces the saison character. You also need some more hop character in there as that it fairly common to the style.

If you think of saison as a technique or broad idea about brewing, then any reasonable beer strain is fair game but I think it needs the refreshing character that any decent Belgian strain can offer and some late hop character.

You won't go wrong using 3711 or one of the Dupont variants available but delicious saisons can be made with abbey/trappist or wit strains. I've tasted a few British strains that could make for an interesting saison with some fruity esters.

kylekohlmorgen:

--- Quote from: garc_mall on February 16, 2013, 01:35:10 PM ---I agree with all of the above.

I think also that brewers friend my have labeled this a saison because of the very low final gravity. AFAIK, blondes usually finish in the 1.010-1.014 range.

--- End quote ---

Good point - A good Saison will be drier than a blonde. Depends on gravity, but with Saison you're looking for 1.008 and below.

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