Author Topic: Polenta  (Read 2323 times)

Offline theoman

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Polenta
« on: February 16, 2013, 09:15:09 AM »
A couple questions about polenta…

I plan to use instant polenta in a pilsner. Do I need to boil it first or just add dry to the mash?

If I decide to do a protein rest, do I do it with or without the polenta?

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2013, 09:50:30 AM »
You need to do a cereal mash, which includes maybe 10% of your base malt, a rest at 158F for 15-20 minutes, then boil it to gelatanize the corn starch.

The corn/maize does not need a protein rest. It is used with high protein malts like NA 6 row to reduce the protein level and reduce chill haze.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline theoman

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2013, 11:30:50 AM »
You need to do a cereal mash, which includes maybe 10% of your base malt, a rest at 158F for 15-20 minutes, then boil it to gelatanize the corn starch.

The corn/maize does not need a protein rest. It is used with high protein malts like NA 6 row to reduce the protein level and reduce chill haze.

Thanks. I'll take your word on the protein rest, but I'm not sure I'm with you on the polenta. I'll be using instant polenta, which is pre-cooked (says so on the package). So it's already gelatanized, no? I guess I'm answering my own question.

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2013, 11:38:03 AM »
I think you're correct on the instant polenta.  If it cooks in <5 minutes I doubt it will be a problem in an hour long mash.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2013, 12:52:12 PM »
You need to do a cereal mash, which includes maybe 10% of your base malt, a rest at 158F for 15-20 minutes, then boil it to gelatanize the corn starch.

The corn/maize does not need a protein rest. It is used with high protein malts like NA 6 row to reduce the protein level and reduce chill haze.

Thanks. I'll take your word on the protein rest, but I'm not sure I'm with you on the polenta. I'll be using instant polenta, which is pre-cooked (says so on the package). So it's already gelatanized, no? I guess I'm answering my own question.

I missed the instant polenta part. Poor reading on my part. Put it straight in the mash, no problem.

Jeff Rankert
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Offline theoman

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2013, 11:53:28 PM »
I missed the instant polenta part. Poor reading on my part. Put it straight in the mash, no problem.

Cool, thanks. i'm off to mash...

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2013, 06:36:17 AM »
I missed the instant polenta part. Poor reading on my part. Put it straight in the mash, no problem.

Cool, thanks. i'm off to mash...

Let us know how it turns out. The CAP we brew every year is a crowd pleaser, even if it has corn in it!
Jeff Rankert
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2013, 06:58:36 AM »
I find corn to be a pleasant addition to a few beers. I like the way it "softly" lightens the body as opposed to sugar which lightens the body but doesn't leave anything but alcohol.

I'm working with some recipes right now with corn grits that I am fairly excited about.
Keith Y.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2013, 07:15:54 AM »
I find corn to be a pleasant addition to a few beers. I like the way it "softly" lightens the body as opposed to sugar which lightens the body but doesn't leave anything but alcohol.

I'm working with some recipes right now with corn grits that I am fairly excited about.
You should be able to source some quality local grits down there.

Edit - what do you plan to do for a cooker? Or are you going to go the instant grits route?
« Last Edit: February 17, 2013, 07:17:58 AM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline theoman

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2013, 12:04:16 PM »
So far, so good. In fact, a little too good. I somehow managed near 89% efficiency. I need to get a refractometer.

The gravity sample was delicious.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2013, 04:14:30 PM »
I find corn to be a pleasant addition to a few beers. I like the way it "softly" lightens the body as opposed to sugar which lightens the body but doesn't leave anything but alcohol.

I'm working with some recipes right now with corn grits that I am fairly excited about.
You should be able to source some quality local grits down there.

Edit - what do you plan to do for a cooker? Or are you going to go the instant grits route?

Yeah, there is a mill just north of us called Falls Mill. They are one of the only water powered mills in the states. Beautiful place, too - http://www.fallsmill.com/

I want to get a cereal cooker. Right now I'm working on 10 gallon recipes. Once I dial in and brew it commercially I'll be sure to pay my debt I owe to you and your friend. (I never brewed the StickeAlt this year. We screwed around and messed up our winter seasonals. Ooops).
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Re: Polenta
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2013, 04:29:22 PM »
I find corn to be a pleasant addition to a few beers. I like the way it "softly" lightens the body as opposed to sugar which lightens the body but doesn't leave anything but alcohol.

I'm working with some recipes right now with corn grits that I am fairly excited about.

I agree.
A lot of self-proclaimed "purists" treat corn like some sort of evil, as though it doesn't belong in "quality" beer.
Nonsense, I say.  I laughed pretty hard when Greg Koch famously said "...I don't use corn in my beer" (perhaps he should actually try it.   LOL)

It has, after all,  been an ingredient in many fine beers for well over a century, including some of my favorite British ales.

In my own brewing I've occasionally used grits (usually the 'quick' or 'instant' kind), cornmeal (yellow and white),  Poha (from the Indo-Paki stores), air-popped popcorn, and even generic brand 'cornflakes'...all with great results.

Contrary to what the Brewer's Association seems to think, corn doesn't need to be as demonized as they seem to think.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2013, 04:31:13 PM by The Professor »
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Polenta
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2013, 05:53:29 AM »
One of the best pilsners I've ever had - "Popcorn Pilsner" by Sun King, made with a BUNCH of local popcorn, all air-popped by the staff at the brewery.

AWESOME video of the making of this beer here (if you're interested):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHaY2xxOfuU




There IS more than corn in Indiana... but not much.
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Re: Polenta
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2013, 06:55:49 AM »
One of the best pilsners I've ever had - "Popcorn Pilsner" by Sun King, made with a BUNCH of local popcorn, all air-popped by the staff at the brewery.
I hope they fermented warm and skipped the diacetyl rest  ;)
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Re: Polenta
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2013, 07:00:14 AM »
+1 Sun King Popcorn Pilsener.  Very tasty indeed.  "Drinking Made Easy" filmed there while they were popping the popcorn. Funny.
Jon H.