Author Topic: Belle Saison Dry Yeast  (Read 21581 times)

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #120 on: September 30, 2013, 11:26:44 AM »
2 weeks?  That is not ripping.  My typical ale ferments are done in less than a week. 

But with respect to the results above, my 1.069 batch did finish out in 2 weeks.  Maybe that is typical.

I see! that makes sense. It did take 2 weeks. After 1 week if was around 1.008 the second week (could have been less than a whole week) took it the rest of the way. I rarely package before week 3 or 4 so I just let it ride for a couple.
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #121 on: September 30, 2013, 01:32:49 PM »
I get no lemon, I get spicy peppery more so than any fruit.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #122 on: October 22, 2013, 12:03:47 PM »
I get no lemon, I get spicy peppery more so than any fruit.

Just finished my first batch with this yeast.  1.058 to 1.004 in 12 days.  I got the peppery as well. no fruit to speak of.  Will keg this weekend and start carbonation.  Will taste next week or so.  My initial impression is that this yeast ferments like a monster, but may not give many aromatics or flavors to the beer.  I started fermentation at 65°F and ramped up to 75°F.  May be a good base yeast if you are thinking about adding citrus zest and/or spices.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #123 on: October 22, 2013, 12:12:32 PM »
I thought about adding orange peel/spices...

I also thought about using 1/2 pack of this yeast with a bit of 3724 slurry
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #124 on: October 22, 2013, 05:16:20 PM »
I concur with Red's assessment.  I used it in a 1.069 Saison that fermented to 0.998.  The initial week was spent at 70F and then I ultimately brought it to 80F to finish.  There are peppery phenols, but this yeast doesn't seem to produce the earthy character that you get with a Dupont yeast.  Some of my fellow clubmates agreed that this yeast would probably make a very nice Belgian Pale Ale. 
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Offline a witty man

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast - Brett C secondary experience?
« Reply #125 on: December 12, 2013, 06:44:45 PM »
Odelay. I really like using a little Brett C on the back end of my saisons. Anyone have experience with a Belle Saison fermented beer with Brett C in secondary? Would there even be anything left for the Brett to work on?
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« Reply #126 on: December 12, 2013, 09:23:06 PM »
Good question.  Nothing really left for the Brett to chew on but you could add extra sugar with it.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast - Brett C secondary experience?
« Reply #127 on: December 13, 2013, 02:23:14 PM »
Odelay. I really like using a little Brett C on the back end of my saisons. Anyone have experience with a Belle Saison fermented beer with Brett C in secondary? Would there even be anything left for the Brett to work on?

I used Belle as the primary yeast in a brett at bottling experiment.

Brett does not need 'food' in the form of residual sugar/dextrin to provide flavor. No need to add sugar.

Since this beer finishes SO dry already, and brett will drive the finishing gravity even lower, keep bittering low and strive for a healthy fermentation. Bitterness, astringency and fermentation flaws (unwanted phenols, higher alcohols) will be punctuated by the bone-dry mouthfeel. I mis-weighed my bittering hops, and 30 IBU tasted like 70.

Also, don't sit on the beer for too long. (IMO) when Brett completely takes over, the complexity of the beer decreases and the harshness increases. Dose in the bottle (if bottling) or the keg and taste every week. When you get the desired level of brett flavor, refrigerate and enjoy!
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast - Brett C secondary experience?
« Reply #128 on: December 13, 2013, 02:40:40 PM »
Odelay. I really like using a little Brett C on the back end of my saisons. Anyone have experience with a Belle Saison fermented beer with Brett C in secondary? Would there even be anything left for the Brett to work on?

I used Belle as the primary yeast in a brett at bottling experiment.

Brett does not need 'food' in the form of residual sugar/dextrin to provide flavor. No need to add sugar.

Since this beer finishes SO dry already, and brett will drive the finishing gravity even lower, keep bittering low and strive for a healthy fermentation. Bitterness, astringency and fermentation flaws (unwanted phenols, higher alcohols) will be punctuated by the bone-dry mouthfeel. I mis-weighed my bittering hops, and 30 IBU tasted like 70.

Also, don't sit on the beer for too long. (IMO) when Brett completely takes over, the complexity of the beer decreases and the harshness increases. Dose in the bottle (if bottling) or the keg and taste every week. When you get the desired level of brett flavor, refrigerate and enjoy!

+1 on less is more with brett. I've been really enjoying the slight hint I get when pitching a blend in primary but drinking the beer in a 'normal' timeframe. I find that with the American Farmhouse blend, if treat it like a 'normal' ferment, i.e. let it go a couple weeks until the gravity becomes more or less stable and keg. I say more or less because I know the brett would take it lower given time but I find, as Kyle says, the brett gets harsh after a while.
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