Author Topic: Keg Help  (Read 1136 times)

Offline brewvet

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Keg Help
« on: February 24, 2013, 04:34:54 PM »
I need some help identifying a potential source of off flavors in my keg.  I have an american honey brown ale that was kegged about 3 weeks ago.  I used forced co2 carbonation and after the first week it tasted great, no off flavors detected, a couple of people couldn't tell the difference between my beer and moose drool brown.  The second week I finished a new "keezer" with a new gas manifold, lines etc.  I cleaned all new lines with PBW and star san before hooking everything back up.  I also had to exchange Co2 tanks and used airgas.  About a week ago I could start to detect some bitter off flavors.  I was out of town for a conference last week and when I tried my beer this afternoon the bitter off flavors are more pronounced, it is still carbonated properly but before I had a nice tan head and now there is little to no head retention.  The temperature in the keezer has been in the high 30's, low 40's (temp regulator).  My co2 pressure is holding so I don't think I have any gas leaks anywhere so I'm not sure where to look for the source of the off flavors.  Any thoughts or ideas would be great.  Thanks.

Offline euge

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Re: Keg Help
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2013, 06:38:24 PM »
Is the beer overcarbed? Too much carbonation can lend a bitterness to the brew.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline brewvet

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Re: Keg Help
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2013, 07:38:55 PM »
No, it doesn't seem to be over carbonated.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Keg Help
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2013, 09:51:14 PM »
How much pressure do you have on the keg?

How clear was it when you kegged it?  It's possible that it is clearing and you are sucking up some stuff that is pulling down some bitterness.

Contamination also comes to mind . . .
Tom Schmidlin

Offline tom

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Re: Keg Help
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2013, 09:17:03 AM »
What is airgas?  If it is air, then you've been oxidizing your beer.
Brew on

Offline garc_mall

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Re: Keg Help
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2013, 10:48:20 AM »
What is airgas?  If it is air, then you've been oxidizing your beer.

Airgas is a company that sells gases. They do CO2 tank exchanges for homebrewers.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison