Author Topic: Gravity Question  (Read 2492 times)

Offline donredbull

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Gravity Question
« on: February 28, 2013, 09:24:16 PM »
This is my first batch in a few years and my OG was 1.060 I had heavy fermentation in 8 hours and it continued for a week. I just racked the beer in a secondary and my gravity is 1.020 that seems like a drastic change to me is this normal?  :o

Offline bboy9000

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2013, 09:42:43 PM »
Not too drastic at all.  66.7% apparent attenuation may be about right.  Was this an extract or all-grain recipe?  If all-grain the 1.020 gravity may be a little high.  Extracts, from what I've read here on the forum, aren't as fermentable. When I did extract brews I was getting FG as high as 1.018.  I rarely get that close with-grain but I'm still working getting my mash temperatures accurate and I never brew any high gravity beers that would finish at 1.020.  I've also been doing a lot of Belgian styles that finish around 1.006 so your change in gravity doesn't seem drastic at all.
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Offline donredbull

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2013, 10:12:02 PM »
Ok thanks for answering so quick. It is a nut brown ale partial mash kit.

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2013, 05:17:02 AM »
Ok thanks for answering so quick. It is a nut brown ale partial mash kit.

What yeast did you use and what was your fermentation temp?
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Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2013, 07:30:02 AM »
Most beers will fully ferment within 3-5 days - a full week is actually fairly long. You may see dissolved CO2 escaping through the airlock afterwards, but chances are almost all fermentation will be finished. Aging it a week or two after often makes it taste better though, because the yeast will remove green and off flavors from the beer.
 
By the way, most homebrewers here (including me) will tell you to skip secondary next time and just let the beer sit in primary for 2-3 weeks - then bottle.  Reasoning -- Transferring introduces oxygen which is a worse risk than leaving it on the yeast (this is really a problem for commercial breweries and large fermenters). Also, removing the beer from the yeast prevents the yeast from cleaning up those green and off flavors.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2013, 07:43:53 AM »
Please post your recipe/process so we can further evaluate.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2013, 07:48:49 AM »
Extracts, from what I've read here on the forum, aren't as fermentable.

That, of course, depends on the extract.  Some, such as Breiss Pils extract, I have found to be highly fermentable.  It's all I use for the last several years.  That said, I agree that it would not be unlikely that an extract nut brown ale would have a high finishing gravity.

By the way, most homebrewers here (including me) will tell you to skip secondary next time and just let the beer sit in primary for 2-3 weeks - then bottle.  Reasoning -- Transferring introduces oxygen which is a worse risk than leaving it on the yeast (this is really a problem for commercial breweries and large fermenters). Also, removing the beer from the yeast prevents the yeast from cleaning up those green and off flavors.

I would also add that secondary is just plain not necessary and you can skip the effort.  I'm kinda lazy and short on time, so anything to gain a little efficiency in the process is a bonus.

Please post your recipe/process so we can further evaluate.

Yes, and it would be helpful to know what extract was used as that might give a clue as to it's fermentability.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline donredbull

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2013, 08:18:37 AM »
6 lbs. light malt extract
1 lbs. crystal 40 malt
1/4 lbs honey malt
1/8 lbs pale chocolate malt
1/8 lbs "special roast"
1oz cluster hop 2 boil
1/2oz styrian hop @ 30 min into boil
white labs english ale yeast
ferment temp = 66 F
Steeped grain @ 155 in 1 1/2 gal H20 for 40 min
boiled with additional 3.5 gals H20 for 1 hour w hops as noted
cooled wort and pitched yeast @ 70F

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2013, 08:30:47 AM »
Liquid malt extract?  Or dry?  Brand? I don't recall if Munton's dry has a low fermentability.  I think it does, but I'm not positive.

I don't use White Labs yeast (foolishly brand loyal, not for any other reason) but that yeast may be a low attenuator.  Many of the English strains are.

Did you make a starter?  Or just pitch the vial?

If you're underpitched with a low attenuating yeast, you may be done.  If the yeast has dropped, I don't think you'll get it to go any further.

I've used the Wyeast ESB yeast, which I believe is supposed to be the same strain, and once it flocculates out it is hard to get it back into suspension to keep working.  And it floccs like crazy.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2013, 08:31:34 AM »
67% attenuation for that yeast is in the zone.  Looks like you will have a nice beer in a couple of weeks.

Agreed on no secondary.  Let it sit in primary for 2-3 weeks.

Dave
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2013, 09:31:35 AM »
I agree with everything posted here.

I would also like to add that 1 1/4 lb of crystal malt, plus what ever is in the extract is quite a bit of crystal malt, which will push up your final gravity.

Also, if it tastes fine, don't worry about it. Every beer you make from here on out will be better than your first batch. If it's drinkable, you have done something right.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2013, 10:41:29 AM »
I agree with everything posted here.

I would also like to add that 1 1/4 lb of crystal malt, plus what ever is in the extract is quite a bit of crystal malt, which will push up your final gravity.

Also, if it tastes fine, don't worry about it. Every beer you make from here on out will be better than your first batch. If it's drinkable, you have done something right.

+1.060
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2013, 10:44:02 AM »
I agree with everything posted here.

I would also like to add that 1 1/4 lb of crystal malt, plus what ever is in the extract is quite a bit of crystal malt, which will push up your final gravity.

Also, if it tastes fine, don't worry about it. Every beer you make from here on out will be better than your first batch. If it's drinkable, you have done something right.

+1.060

I think that's where life begins Denny. :)
Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2013, 10:47:45 AM »
6 lbs. light malt extract
1 lbs. crystal 40 malt
1/4 lbs honey malt
1/8 lbs pale chocolate malt
1/8 lbs "special roast"
1oz cluster hop 2 boil
1/2oz styrian hop @ 30 min into boil
white labs english ale yeast
ferment temp = 66 F
Steeped grain @ 155 in 1 1/2 gal H20 for 40 min
boiled with additional 3.5 gals H20 for 1 hour w hops as noted
cooled wort and pitched yeast @ 70F

I agree with what others have posted. With the level of crystal malt AND the particular yeast strain used, I would expect this level of attenuation. Overall, I think you're in the ball park with this recipe.
Ron Price

Offline donredbull

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Re: Gravity Question
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2013, 10:49:48 AM »
Liquid malt extract?  Or dry?  Brand? I don't recall if Munton's dry has a low fermentability.  I think it does, but I'm not positive.

I don't use White Labs yeast (foolishly brand loyal, not for any other reason) but that yeast may be a low attenuator.  Many of the English strains are.

Did you make a starter?  Or just pitch the vial?

If you're underpitched with a low attenuating yeast, you may be done.  If the yeast has dropped, I don't think you'll get it to go any further.

I've used the Wyeast ESB yeast, which I believe is supposed to be the same strain, and once it flocculates out it is hard to get it back into suspension to keep working.  And it floccs like crazy.
I used beer at homes brand LME it is a local homebrew shop I dont know if they are national chain or just here in Colorado it was their kit I just followed the directions and no I didn't make a starter