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Using clarifier at the end of fermentation

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awfenske:
I have an Imperial Nut Brown in primary fermentation - today is the 11th day in the primary. After two weeks, assuming I have hit the appropriate FG, I'd like to rack it and add Biofine, then bottle it once the Biofine has done its work (maybe 24-36hrs, based on visual).

I used Biofine recently in a batch of mead I made, and it had an amazing effect even within the first few hours. Over a month after bottling there is almost zero visible sediment in the bottles. So I figured it would be great to use this stuff in beer, but I want to make sure it will not drop out all or too much of the yeast since I will be bottle conditioning.

Just to clarify (no pun intended!), I'm looking for opinions or experience on using Biofine after fermentation is complete, not to stir up (again, no pun intended) epic battles about how long to wait before racking to secondary or whether secondary fermentation is necessary or beneficial. I'm only planning on racking it in order to get the Biofine mixed in without kicking up the yeast cake, so if the consensus is that the Biofine will drop out too much yeast then I'll just bottle straight out of the primary after the two-week mark, again assuming the correct FG has been reached. I would love to be able to drink a home brew straight from the bottle rather than decanting and leaving that precious bit behind, but maybe I'm just crazy.

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: awfenske on March 04, 2013, 12:35:37 PM ---I have an Imperial Nut Brown in primary fermentation - today is the 11th day in the primary. After two weeks, assuming I have hit the appropriate FG, I'd like to rack it and add Biofine, then bottle it once the Biofine has done its work (maybe 24-36hrs, based on visual).

I used Biofine recently in a batch of mead I made, and it had an amazing effect even within the first few hours. Over a month after bottling there is almost zero visible sediment in the bottles. So I figured it would be great to use this stuff in beer, but I want to make sure it will not drop out all or too much of the yeast since I will be bottle conditioning.

Just to clarify (no pun intended!), I'm looking for opinions or experience on using Biofine after fermentation is complete, not to stir up (again, no pun intended) epic battles about how long to wait before racking to secondary or whether secondary fermentation is necessary or beneficial. I'm only planning on racking it in order to get the Biofine mixed in without kicking up the yeast cake, so if the consensus is that the Biofine will drop out too much yeast then I'll just bottle straight out of the primary after the two-week mark, again assuming the correct FG has been reached. I would love to be able to drink a home brew straight from the bottle rather than decanting and leaving that precious bit behind, but maybe I'm just crazy.

--- End quote ---

There will be a little yeast left behind in the bottle. I don't see how you would avoid that AND bottle condition. The yeast that produce the co2 will drop out when the food supply is exhausted.

If you want perfectly clear beer that you can drink straight from the bottle (does it matter if it's perfectly clear at that point? can you see it?) try kegging and bottling from the keg.

I regularly see a little sediment in a bottle of Sierra Nevada because they are bottle conditioned.

awfenske:
My primary concern is the batch in progress right now, so switching to kegging is not an option in the next 3 days. I am just looking for some info as to whether Biofine will drop out too much of the yeast thereby preventing regular carbonation in the bottle.

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: awfenske on March 04, 2013, 01:48:51 PM ---My primary concern is the batch in progress right now, so switching to kegging is not an option in the next 3 days. I am just looking for some info as to whether Biofine will drop out too much of the yeast thereby preventing regular carbonation in the bottle.

--- End quote ---

I'm sorry  I really didn't mean to sound snarky. And I do not know the answer to your question but I would be hesitant to remove that much yeast and still attempt it. I would go ahead and add a little yeast at bottling time. maybe .5 packets of us-05 per 5 gallons.

I was simply saying that you WILL end up with sediment if you do this so the idea of drinking straight out of the bottle is out unless you want to drink some yeast which is not that big of a deal either.

a10t2:
The amount of yeast needed is so small that I would say you *could* leave enough in suspension to carbonate. I would instead do what Sierra Nevada does, substituting fining for filtration. Dose with the BioFine as usual, then rack the bright beer into the bottling bucket and add the bottling yeast (1 million/mL, which is 1 g rehydrated dry yeast for 5 gal) along with the priming sugar.

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