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hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: duboman on March 19, 2013, 03:38:47 PM ---
--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on March 19, 2013, 03:25:25 PM ---
--- Quote from: duboman on March 19, 2013, 02:11:28 PM ---So then for lighter beers with my water alkalinity being 100 would a little acidulated malt be beneficial in the mash to assist with the pH?by

--- End quote ---
Prabably. Try a test mash with a small weight of the grist and your water before you brew. If it is too high, then formulate the recipe with acidulated malt. Weyermann says 1% will lower the pH 0.1, so start there and see where you end up. Adjust the mash up/down once you measure.

--- End quote ---

Cool, I'm working up a Belgian Wit/white recipe that this will probably be necessary for as I don't anticipate the grist dropping the pH to desirable levels

I'm trying to get something like Allagash White, looks like I might need to use about 5% but that seems like a lot? My normal pH is in the very low 6 range and my regular beers have always gotten me a good pH with out its use.

--- End quote ---
The correct answer is it depends. Water pH means little. Mash pH means a lot.

duboman:

--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on March 19, 2013, 04:56:51 PM ---
--- Quote from: duboman on March 19, 2013, 03:38:47 PM ---
--- Quote from: hopfenundmalz on March 19, 2013, 03:25:25 PM ---
--- Quote from: duboman on March 19, 2013, 02:11:28 PM ---So then for lighter beers with my water alkalinity being 100 would a little acidulated malt be beneficial in the mash to assist with the pH?by

--- End quote ---
Prabably. Try a test mash with a small weight of the grist and your water before you brew. If it is too high, then formulate the recipe with acidulated malt. Weyermann says 1% will lower the pH 0.1, so start there and see where you end up. Adjust the mash up/down once you measure.

--- End quote ---

Cool, I'm working up a Belgian Wit/white recipe that this will probably be necessary for as I don't anticipate the grist dropping the pH to desirable levels

I'm trying to get something like Allagash White, looks like I might need to use about 5% but that seems like a lot? My normal pH is in the very low 6 range and my regular beers have always gotten me a good pH with out its use.

--- End quote ---
The correct answer is it depends. Water pH means little. Mash pH means a lot.

--- End quote ---

This I know, I'll play with the lactic acid and see where that gets me, thanks to all! A lot to digest and think about...

duboman:
So to update, sort of....
Just did a side by side of my house pale ale, the second with treating the water with 10grams Gypsum and the hop profile is much more pronounced and crisp and I am very pleased with the improvement and the little effort that was required!

Just made one of my favorites even better than it was!

mabrungard:
There is sort of an anti-sulfate crusade that has been promulgated by a person that only brews European light lagers. Unfortunately, that sentiment has 'bled' into the psyches of other brewers and their quest for great beer.  I can assure you that many styles benefit from varying levels of sulfate in the brewing water. Lately, the lore has been that sulfate enhances bitterness perception (which it does).  However sulfate is actually helping to dry the beer finish (which enhances bitterness perception) and that can be a valuable tool for the brewer to tune their beers.

Certainly, sulfate should be used in moderation. But it should be viewed as an important tool in perfecting your beers. Using it only in hoppy beers may restrict your brewing abilities. Next time you have a recipe that produces a beer that doesn't dry the finish adequately, think about bumping the sulfate content of the water up a bit. An extra 20 ppm may be all you need.

Don't be afraid of sulfate!

hopfenundmalz:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on April 20, 2013, 05:02:04 AM ---There is sort of an anti-sulfate crusade that has been promulgated by a person that only brews European light lagers. Unfortunately, that sentiment has 'bled' into the psyches of other brewers and their quest for great beer.  I can assure you that many styles benefit from varying levels of sulfate in the brewing water. Lately, the lore has been that sulfate enhances bitterness perception (which it does).  However sulfate is actually helping to dry the beer finish (which enhances bitterness perception) and that can be a valuable tool for the brewer to tune their beers.

Certainly, sulfate should be used in moderation. But it should be viewed as an important tool in perfecting your beers. Using it in hoppy beers only may restrict your brewing abilities. Next time you have a recipe that produces a beer that doesn't dry the finish adequately, thinOils out bumping the sulfate content of the water up a bit. An extra 20 ppm may be all you need.

Don't be afraid of sulfate!

--- End quote ---
I agree, for my German Pils sulfate at about 80 ppm gives the dry lingering finish that I want.

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