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malzig:
BIAB does seem like a good way to start, if you want to give it a try before building a tun.  What I can't figure out is where you save an hour or more of time. 

My second kettles sits inside the other, with my pitcher, salts, and thermometer inside that, so it doesn't take more time to move 1 than two.  Juggling the lids can be a little problematic.  Bring those upstairs, fill with water, throw in a little metabisulfate, and start heating the mash water.  Then, my tun is down next to my grain bins.  I grind right into the tun, then use the tun to carry the grain upstairs.  When the water hits strike temperature, it goes into the tun. 

At the end of the day, I carry the tun out to the compost pile, and turn it upside down.  Rinse the tun a couple times with the hose (or the shower, in the winter) and it goes back down cellar.  Wipe the kettle clean, everything goes back inside, and it all goes back down cellar.

I suppose I could streamline that to only 1 trip downstairs with 1 kettle and a bag, but that's only 2 minutes at the beginning and end of the day.

erockrph:

--- Quote from: malzig on March 12, 2013, 04:31:20 AM ---BIAB does seem like a good way to start, if you want to give it a try before building a tun. 
--- End quote ---

BIAB isn't just for starting into AG. It makes great beers as-is, so there is no real impetus to switch to a more traditional method with batch or fly sparging using multiple vessels unless you just want to try something different. Unless I have a need to jump to large batch sizes in the future I'm pretty sure I'll stick to BIAB for my all-grain brewing.

Having said that, I don't think there's a heck of a lot of time savings between BIAB and batch sparging. If you already are set up for batch or fly sparging, I don't see a big reason to switch to BIAB. It would be good if you wanted to add a separate pilot system or cut down your batch sizes, but otherwise the time savings isn't as huge as people say it is.

mpietropaoli:

--- Quote from: malzig on March 12, 2013, 04:31:20 AM --- What I can't figure out is where you save an hour or more of time. 


--- End quote ---

I suppose I should also mention that I upgraded to a Blichmann burner :-)

beersk:

--- Quote from: erockrph on March 12, 2013, 09:01:17 AM ---
--- Quote from: malzig on March 12, 2013, 04:31:20 AM ---BIAB does seem like a good way to start, if you want to give it a try before building a tun. 
--- End quote ---



Having said that, I don't think there's a heck of a lot of time savings between BIAB and batch sparging. If you already are set up for batch or fly sparging, I don't see a big reason to switch to BIAB. It would be good if you wanted to add a separate pilot system or cut down your batch sizes, but otherwise the time savings isn't as huge as people say it is.

--- End quote ---
It's true, there isn't a ton of time savings, it still takes me about 4 1/2 hours to brew a batch.  I do, however, get better efficiency with brew in a bag because I can mill finer, not having to worry about stuck runoffs, and I can squeeze the bag to get extra wort out. So those really are the benefits for me, other than the fact that it's simple and easy. Plus I like being able to keep my mash temperature steady at whatever temp I want with direct fire and a false bottom. That does mean I need to constantly stir the mash while I'm direct firing it, but it's really no big deal for me.
I like the idea of using all my water in one go, put in all my salts, etc.

weithman5:
i do more of a mash in a bag now.again i only brew 2-3 gallon batches.  i mill fine and keep the grain in a grain bag in an igloo cooler.  collect the runoff like normal.  i boil in a 4g electric kettle.  i do have a new kettle i will be making this summer. it is an 8 gallon IMUSA seafood steamer, which i will turn in to an electric kettle if there is room for the element. it has a tray for seafood that will also hold the grain bag on if i were to boil directly. 

one of the reasons for the mash in a bag is that it makes it easy to use the grains for bread and dog treats over the next week.  i just pull the bag and put it in tupperware

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