Author Topic: Multiple Ferms  (Read 751 times)

Offline ytbrew

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Multiple Ferms
« on: March 14, 2013, 06:41:24 PM »
     I want to try making a Quad for the first time. Basically following to same process as Allagash outlines  in Brew like a Monk. My question is, how much pressure is needed to push to beer through a 1 micron filter cartridge. I don't own kegging equipment and am wondering if there is any other way to do this. Air pressure on a sealed pail? It will get new yeast for bottling. Thanks for any suggestions.

Online euge

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2013, 07:43:06 PM »
Why do you want to filter?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

cornershot

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2013, 07:52:32 PM »
Not sure about the low-tech methods. Definitely do not use compressed air. You'll oxidize your beer. Use co2 or nitrogen. That will require a tank and regulator along with an inline filter. If you have that you might as well have a couple kegs too. Check with your LHBS. Mine rents a filter for $20. Still too much? Try finings. Still too much? Store at as cool a temperature as possible until it's clear. If you want it clear fast, I'd go with finings like isinglass or biofine. Filtering beer, as I understand it, will strip out some flavor.
If it were my quad, I'd just give it time. Because a quad needs time to develop to it's full potential anyway.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2013, 05:28:22 AM »
If it were my quad, I'd just give it time. Because a quad needs time to develop to it's full potential anyway.

+1

Even really finicky yeast will drop pretty clear in the time frame you're looking at before a Quad hits its prime.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2013, 05:46:12 AM »
+1.  The time frame needed to age a quad would have it pretty clear by then. Plus, quad is a style built upon layers of flavor, and I wouldn't risk stripping any flavor away. Not a filtering fan.
Jon H.

Offline ytbrew

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2013, 02:50:40 PM »
Basically following the process of Allagash 4. After the 1st. three yeasts have done their work, they filter our the yeast and add a fourth bottle conditioning.

Online euge

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Re: Multiple Ferms
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2013, 03:01:49 PM »
Following the processes of a brewery is not a guarantee of replicating their beer. In fact, doing so at a homebrew level will most likely end in failure. Best of luck. Try cold crashing instead. 
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman