Author Topic: Brewing over Two days  (Read 2024 times)

Offline HobsonDrake

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 48
  • I think, therefore I brew.
    • View Profile
Brewing over Two days
« on: March 18, 2013, 02:09:39 PM »
I "need" to brew a pale ale that I do on a regular basis. I don't have the time to do it all in one day as I normally would. So I am thinking of breaking it up over two days. First day get through the sparge and hold the the wert in a couple of containers until I can do the boil. The next day or two later.
My question is, can you think of any reason this should not be done?
For some reason I need to validate the process to be sure I am not over looking something.
Thanks.
John
>Under Construction- Brown Ale (4/5)
>In Bottles- Just Plain Pale Ale (12/12) - First Lager (12/28)
>On Tap - Guinness Clone (5/13) - Dry Hopped Red - Wascally Wabbit PA (11/19) - Barley wine (10/2009) - Nut Brown Ale(6/6)

Offline secoulte

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 02:49:40 PM »
In the past year or so I did this by necessity.  I started brewing a lager that needed a boost from some corn sugar during the boil.  Since I don't often brew with corn sugar, I didn't have any on hand, and completely forgot it.  By the time I finished sparging I realized it was too late to hit the HBS or the local bulk food store.

I sparged into the kettle and kept it sealed and covered in my cool garage overnight.  I boiled away the next day and the beer came through with seemingly no problems in the long run.  I am sure this isn't advisable due to susceptibility of infection, but I didn't really have a choice and it worked out fine. 
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 03:01:02 PM by secoulte »
Last 5 Brewed:
Hibiscus Honey Wheat
Black IPA
Wet Hop American Lager
Duvel Green/Single Clone
Chocolate Espresso Porter

Offline erockrph

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2436
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • Critical Tastings
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 02:57:36 PM »
If you don't boil, then I would be worried about a potential infection (lacto in particular). If you can at least get your wort up to pasteurization temps for long enough (I think 180F for 15 minutes, but don't quote me on this), then you should be OK.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline gsandel

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 324
  • www.onbeer.blogspot.com
    • View Profile
    • On Beer
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 04:02:02 PM »
A nice boil kills the bad guys. proceed.
You wouldn't believe the things I've seen...

Offline gmac

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2030
  • London, Ontario
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 06:31:29 PM »
I often mash and boil on day 1 and then cover and cool over night and pitch the next day. Not exactly what your intent but I get a bit lazy too.

Offline HobsonDrake

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 48
  • I think, therefore I brew.
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 06:51:38 PM »
A nice boil kills the bad guys. proceed.

This is what I thought. But sometimes you over look something and I didn't want to waste time and materials.
>Under Construction- Brown Ale (4/5)
>In Bottles- Just Plain Pale Ale (12/12) - First Lager (12/28)
>On Tap - Guinness Clone (5/13) - Dry Hopped Red - Wascally Wabbit PA (11/19) - Barley wine (10/2009) - Nut Brown Ale(6/6)

Offline mtnrockhopper

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2898
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2013, 07:02:11 PM »
If you don't boil, then I would be worried about a potential infection (lacto in particular). If you can at least get your wort up to pasteurization temps for long enough (I think 180F for 15 minutes, but don't quote me on this), then you should be OK.
145F for 30 minutes is also proper pasteurization temp/time - so after a 60 minute mash the wort should be pretty safe to store for the night.
Jimmy K

Delmarva United Homebrewers - President by inverse coup when the old president ousted himself.
AHA Member since 2006
BJCP: B0958

Offline benamcg

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2013, 06:23:59 AM »
I probably brewed 20+ batches with the day 1 pre-boil, day 2 boil to ferment method- out of necessity (small kids and long brew days).  I did get my one and only infection this way.  The wort was bubbling away in the kettle when I went to boil the next morning.  This was also in the summer and ambient temps were conducive for lacto to get going.  I had invested the time, so I actually went ahead, boiled and fermented......tasted awful and had to pitch.  So, 95% time (or more), this methodology worked great.

Online tomsawyer

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1684
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2013, 10:15:30 AM »
145F for 30 minutes is also proper pasteurization temp/time - so after a 60 minute mash the wort should be pretty safe to store for the night.
If this were true then why does the grist from a mash tend to sour after a day or two?  I think you'd be safer to bring the wort to a boil and then let it sti until the next day.
Lennie
Hannibal, MO

Offline a10t2

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3168
  • Ask me why I don't like Chico!
    • View Profile
    • SeanTerrill.com
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2013, 11:37:28 AM »
If this were true then why does the grist from a mash tend to sour after a day or two?  I think you'd be safer to bring the wort to a boil and then let it sti until the next day.

I agree, but IME unboiled wort in a sterile container doesn't start fermenting for at least 3-5 days. 24 hours is probably 99.9% safe.
Beer is like porn. You can buy it, but it's more fun to make your own.
http://seanterrill.com/category/brewing/

Offline gsandel

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 324
  • www.onbeer.blogspot.com
    • View Profile
    • On Beer
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2013, 12:55:57 PM »
stress sanitized and covered or sealed wort container.....keep cool if able....boil as soon as able.
You wouldn't believe the things I've seen...

Offline hoser

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2013, 01:03:23 PM »
You might want to ramp it up to boiling quick to stop enzyme conversion and kill all the unwanted micro-organisms before brewing it the next day. Especially, if it is gonna be awhile before you get to it?

The other option would be to mash in overnight?

In all likelihood, it will be fine.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 01:21:04 PM by hoser »

Online kramerog

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 789
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2013, 01:14:22 PM »
Mash temps do not kill off lacto and other nasties like (clostridium butyricum).  Heating the wort up to 170F for 15 minutes is really a good idea.  Also if you can keep all your wort in 1 pot and insulate it real well, you might maintain the temperature high enough (~130 F) where your beer spoilers don't multiply.  The chances of being unlucky are low, but not negligible, if you don't heat it to 170 F.
Brewers of South Suburbia
Brixie's Brewers
Oak Park Homebrewers

Offline HobsonDrake

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 48
  • I think, therefore I brew.
    • View Profile
Re: Brewing over Two days
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2013, 05:38:07 PM »
The other option would be to mash in overnight?


OK. I hadn't thought of that. I mash in a 10 gal igloo. If my start temp is 154* and I let it sit for 20-24 hours the temp will fall to an unknown. Probably room temp of 65*. What is that going to do for conversion? Kind of a reverse step mash? Does that work to go from high to low for converting?

>Under Construction- Brown Ale (4/5)
>In Bottles- Just Plain Pale Ale (12/12) - First Lager (12/28)
>On Tap - Guinness Clone (5/13) - Dry Hopped Red - Wascally Wabbit PA (11/19) - Barley wine (10/2009) - Nut Brown Ale(6/6)

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11694
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Brewing over Two days
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2013, 06:57:54 PM »
The other option would be to mash in overnight?


OK. I hadn't thought of that. I mash in a 10 gal igloo. If my start temp is 154* and I let it sit for 20-24 hours the temp will fall to an unknown. Probably room temp of 65*. What is that going to do for conversion? Kind of a reverse step mash? Does that work to go from high to low for converting?

I bet it won't fall below the mid 140s.  Wrap your cooler in some blankets or sleeping bags.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe