Author Topic: Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?  (Read 956 times)

Offline kraftwerk

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Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?
« on: March 18, 2013, 08:07:23 PM »
Just brewed a double IPA for the first time and got crap efficiency. I have been doing single infusion mashing with fly sparge at 168 degrees. My mash rested at 150 for 75 min (as recommended by BeerSmith.) As I understand, higher mash temps make for increased efficiency but lowered fermentability. Although 150 is not high, it is higher than my usual 148 mash for light-bodied, dry ales.

So, if I raised the whole mash to 168 before vorlauf and lautering, would I see an increase in efficiency? I know this is a debated issue so maybe I'm beating a dead horse. I won't even get into the batch sparge vs. fly sparge debate...
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:09:28 PM by kraftwerk »
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Offline tygo

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Re: Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 08:21:04 PM »
You would probably see an increase in lauter efficiency.  And if you're not getting full conversion at the lower temp then it may help finish it off. 

Sometimes though with big beers where you're using a thicker mash you just need to recognize that you're going to get a lower efficiency than you may be accustomed to with normal gravity worts and compensate for it. 

I often get 80% efficiency on my "normal beers" and 70% on my big, all malt ones. 
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Offline wort-h.o.g.

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Re: Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2013, 07:37:33 AM »
Just brewed a double IPA for the first time and got crap efficiency. I have been doing single infusion mashing with fly sparge at 168 degrees. My mash rested at 150 for 75 min (as recommended by BeerSmith.) As I understand, higher mash temps make for increased efficiency but lowered fermentability. Although 150 is not high, it is higher than my usual 148 mash for light-bodied, dry ales.

So, if I raised the whole mash to 168 before vorlauf and lautering, would I see an increase in efficiency? I know this is a debated issue so maybe I'm beating a dead horse. I won't even get into the batch sparge vs. fly sparge debate...

IME, when I started doing a mash out ,adding 5-6 qts of water to raise grist to about 168f, it did increase my efficiency. I also then batch sparge with water temp to keep grist around 168f. If you keep your ph in check, there should be no adverse results ( tannins). My efficiency went from high 70's to low 80's, to upper 80's to low 90's.

Offline malzig

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Re: Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2013, 04:34:07 AM »
A mashout can help, but, for the problem that it helps, you might see the best effect on increased efficiency by raising the temperature into the 158-162F temperature range.  At that point you are improving gelatinization but maintaining amylase activity longer.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Does increased mashout temp boost efficiency?
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2013, 05:36:58 AM »
Since I run a RIMS, I can directly observe the increase in wort gravity with a mash out temperature step.  With no extra water added, the wort gravity rises by several points.  Since its not a big deal to perform a mash out step with a RIMS, its a no-brainer for me.
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