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Hop stand for increased flavor/aroma

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narcout:
There was an interesting, though short, discussion about this method on the NB forum over the summer, and I'm curious as to whether anyone here has experimented with it.

Basically, rather than (or in addition to ) dryhopping, you add hops at flame out and then let the wort stand hot for a period of time (I've seen 60 minutes and 80 minutes suggested) before chilling. The result is supposed to be a better hop flavor and aroma as compared to dryhopping.

Thoughts?

woody:
I remember that thread and would love to hear about some results.  I'm looking for some ways for getting more hop flavor and aroma into my amber ale.   Maye I'll make a 10 gallon 'experiment' if I get the guts

maxieboy:
It works. A couple of months ago, I did a Shark's Tooth Pacific Pale Ale clone that calls for a flameout hop addition, cool wort to 180* and hold for 30 min. No IC here, added flameout hops, let stand 5 min, then heat exchanged(10g, 10 min.). Finished beer had killer hop flavor and aroma with pale ale bitterness. Awesome brew! Here: http://www.tastybrew.com/newrcp/detail/104

crabber:

--- Quote from: maxieboy on November 08, 2009, 08:45:36 PM ---It works. A couple of months ago, I did a Shark's Tooth Pacific Pale Ale clone that calls for a flameout hop addition, cool wort to 180* and hold for 30 min. No IC here, added flameout hops, let stand 5 min, then heat exchanged(10g, 10 min.). Finished beer had killer hop flavor and aroma with pale ale bitterness. Awesome brew! Here: http://www.tastybrew.com/newrcp/detail/104

--- End quote ---
Partially cooling the wort sounds interesting.  That was actually my first thought when I first read this post yesterday.  It must change the way the hops are isomerized.  Is the effect similar to FWH?  Where did you get the idea?

blatz:
I just tried this with my India Red Ale back in August, though I couldn't bring myself to let it sit the whole 80 minutes - I went about a half hour. We had one of the two kegs at a party a few weeks ago.

The hop aroma is very nice - like a more refined, rounded dry hopping.  The bitterness of the beer seemed higher than what was calculated, and based on my experience with the same hop schedule, so I attribute some of that to the longer steep. 

I don't like not being able to get a handle on what the resultant bitterness is going to be - I know I can trial and error it, but I am 3 parts German, and that just drives the precision side of me bonkers.

What I really did not like was the fact that this batch did not drop crystal clear.  My IPAs/PAs are usually a touch hazy from dryhopping, but are otherwise clear, and overall all my beers are very, very translucent.  This is actually pretty murky.  When I tap the other keg, perhaps I'll take a picture of the pint.  I suspect that this is a result of not chilling quick enough after the boil was complete? 

Obviously, this is only one data point - I would need to do additional trials to see if this is indeed the cause, but the result is not so over the top great or better than flameout+keghopping that I usually do to make it worthwhile, IMO.

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