Author Topic: Why do YOU keg?  (Read 9800 times)

Offline Pinski

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2013, 10:39:17 AM »
Both packages have their place.  I prefer kegs, but I still bottle for comps, gifts, lengthy storage and travel. 
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Offline snowtiger87

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2013, 12:46:56 PM »
I do both. I bottle condition my Belgian-style beers and generally keg everything else. On occasion I will bottle beers out of a keg for competition or for longer term storage or if I need the keg for a new beer.
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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2013, 01:29:39 PM »
All good reasons given so far, but I didn't see anyone mention oxidation. A standard crown cap lets in about 200-500 ppb O2 per month, and 500 or so is pretty much the maximum allowable level for long-term storage.
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Offline dean_palmer

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2013, 01:56:42 PM »
I have so many reasons for kegging, but most of the mechanical universals have been mentioned already. It's simply the best package for most styles. I still bottle (from the keg) for competition and gifting and such, but rarely, and have a Blichmann gun that makes that a decent process as well. I just hate dealing with bottles no matter how good I get at it and how many years I've been doing it.

I generally keep 4 beers on tap and like the ability to sample a little bit at a time and serve small samples to visitors without having to open a whole bottle when not needed. It's surprising how many times a visitor will drink less than 12oz and sample all the beers, and most of the time it's not because the beer sucks :-0

I also like that when we have gatherings, brew days, parties, etc, that people enjoy serving themselves beer from a faucet. I see that for many folks it's a fun novelty that we take for granted. For kids we sometimes carbonate some water and make sodas with syrups. Parties don't end up with bottles everywhere and broken.



Offline davidgzach

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2013, 03:29:07 PM »
I like to bottle high gravity beers so it doesn't sit on tap for 2 months and I can enjoy them at my leisure.  I think kegging is just so much easier though.  And I'm not crouched on the floor with a leaky bottle wand spraying beer all over the place.

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Offline dudesbrews

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2013, 03:35:50 PM »
I tend to keg my session beers. That way when I say "just another half a glass" (usually more than once) I can't get myself into too much trouble.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2013, 04:12:05 PM »
And I'm not crouched on the floor with a leaky bottle wand spraying beer all over the place.

I heard that can happen as you get older, but you might want to get it checked out.
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Offline thebigbaker

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2013, 04:30:22 PM »
For me, kegging is quicker.  I've only bottled a couple of times, so my bottling process may not be the best.  I do intend on bottling a few batches for the fall and winter. 
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2013, 04:47:39 PM »
And I'm not crouched on the floor with a leaky bottle wand spraying beer all over the place.

I heard that can happen as you get older, but you might want to get it checked out.

OK, two leaky bottle wands....
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Offline surfin_mikeg

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2013, 06:27:14 PM »
Craft beer tastes better from the keg.  Always on the hunt for Aroma Coma.  For homebrew, bottled conditioned tastes better (and is more visceral).  Kinda like there's a 9-times-out-of-10 off-flavor with kegging that I can only describe as "force carbonated".  Any ROT to get beyond that?

p.s.  happy baseball season.

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Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2013, 06:54:13 PM »
Craft beer tastes better from the keg.  Always on the hunt for Aroma Coma.  For homebrew, bottled conditioned tastes better (and is more visceral).  Kinda like there's a 9-times-out-of-10 off-flavor with kegging that I can only describe as "force carbonated".  Any ROT to get beyond that?

p.s.  happy baseball season.

Can you please explain how bottle conditioned taste better for homebrew and not craft? That is making about zero sense to me.

Draft beer in every instance stays fresh longer, is easier to dial in Co2 volumes, and has better protection from light and o2 than bottles, both homebrew and craft.
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Offline jeffgolf1

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2013, 07:10:30 PM »
I wasn't very good at cleaning and sanitizing bottles.  It is a lot easier to clean one giant stainless steel bottle.

Offline surfin_mikeg

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2013, 07:45:48 PM »
Craft beer tastes better from the keg.  Always on the hunt for Aroma Coma.  For homebrew, bottled conditioned tastes better (and is more visceral).  Kinda like there's a 9-times-out-of-10 off-flavor with kegging that I can only describe as "force carbonated".  Any ROT to get beyond that?

p.s.  happy baseball season.

Can you please explain how bottle conditioned taste better for homebrew and not craft? That is making about zero sense to me.

Draft beer in every instance stays fresh longer, is easier to dial in Co2 volumes, and has better protection from light and o2 than bottles, both homebrew and craft.

It's an opinion.  There's a number of beers on tap that for me simply have a certain characteristic that's unappealing.  I'll pass.

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2013, 05:22:13 AM »
I like to bottle high gravity beers so it doesn't sit on tap for 2 months and I can enjoy them at my leisure. 

Same here but I will keg it first to get the carbonation set and and age it a bit, but then bottle the batch with the beergun for long term aging.
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Offline beersk

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Re: Why do YOU keg?
« Reply #29 on: April 05, 2013, 06:39:40 AM »
Thanks for you input, guys! Always interesting to see what others think and why they do the things they do. I really agree with most reasons why people keg and they're the reasons I want to keep kegging. I like to have hefes in bottles though for the yeast. I don't do many higher gravity beers, none more than about 7%, so I don't bottle for that reason really.
I'm in the process of figuring out why all my IPA's are turning to butterscotch a week or so into the keg and I'm thinking it's from infection of some kind, because it gets worse over time. So I'm thinking a good thorough cleaning of kegs and replacing of tap lines is in order.
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