General Category > Kegging and Bottling

beer line formula???

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skyler:
IME, 8' is the shortest you can have with any consistency. Some beers are foamier than others and need more back-pressure to pour right. My kegerator came with 5' lines and everything was foamy-poured for almost 2 years. Once I switched to 8' lines, I was finally able to consistently pour moderately-carbonated beer.

aschecte:
I have a similar post going on right now too... same problem as you excessive foaming and it's a PITA to say the least. From both this forum as well as HBT I have come to a few conclusions as well as facts. #1 fluid dynamics is very hard at least for me to comprehend #2 there is no consistency and any formula you find online is for commercial pouring at 1gal/min flow rates as speed is of an essence where as homebrewers it's more a matter of pride and we don't mind waiting the extra 5 seconds to fill a pint. the best advice I was given so far and I beliee this to be correct is to start longer than you think you need for example I am running as of today 13' per tap of 3/16" bevflex200 at 10 psi at 37-40 degrees if I just followed the math I only would hae needed 4-5' which would have been too short. I find that the pour is alright but a bit slow but not by much.... as I was told it's easier to shorten the length than to add more footage on. So I guess what i'm saying is use that 2-3psi reduction that 3/16" tube has a double what you actually think you need than shorten it gradually until the pour is perfect to your liking. I know this is not the most scientific approach but, I think it will save you a lot of headaches.

Pi:
Guess i dont understand the relevance to the length if hose. Are we talking about the gas line or the line going to the tap? Fluid dynamics is one (of many) of my weak points. And what length should you use when filling bottles?

Joe Sr.:
Length of the gas line is irrelevant.  Length of the liquid line to the tap is important.  The longer the line, the further you have to push the beer (more resistance) which reduces pressure at the tap and gives you a nice pour.  To much pressure and the beer shoots out and you have a cup of foam.

Narrower lines should require less length.  Higher serving pressure requires more length. Etc. etc.

Starting long and reducing to what works for your system is the best way to go. 

If, for some reason, you need short lines you place epoxy mixers into the dip tube which creates resistance and allows a good pour with a minimal line.  There are a lot of threads on this if you google it.

aschecte:

--- Quote from: Joe Sr. on April 23, 2013, 06:44:32 AM ---Length of the gas line is irrelevant.  Length of the liquid line to the tap is important.  The longer the line, the further you have to push the beer (more resistance) which reduces pressure at the tap and gives you a nice pour.  To much pressure and the beer shoots out and you have a cup of foam.

Narrower lines should require less length.  Higher serving pressure requires more length. Etc. etc.

Starting long and reducing to what works for your system is the best way to go. 

If, for some reason, you need short lines you place epoxy mixers into the dip tube which creates resistance and allows a good pour with a minimal line.  There are a lot of threads on this if you google it.

--- End quote ---

Hind sight is 20/20 at least in my situation but, these epoxy mixers I've seen them in action and they work great but my fear has always been the food grade safety issue with these. Is there any links or info showing that the swizzle sticks don't leach any type of toxins ?

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