Author Topic: beer line formula???  (Read 1960 times)

Offline cwbrew

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beer line formula???
« on: April 12, 2013, 06:26:36 AM »
have a english bitter on tap. force carbed for 3 days at 30psi then droped it to 8psi beer comes out a little to foamy if you are not carefull with the pour. tried dropping it all the way to 3psi and not much differance. took it back to 8psi currently, im thinking i either have to long of beer line or too short. this is a new system and id like to get it dialed in right from the start. if anyone can give me a place to go look up the formulas for beer line length and diameter verse pressure id appreciate it. (id beerline is 3/16 and 5 feet of line at 8psi with 3 1/2" shank running in a 36degree keezer if this helps)

Offline Slowbrew

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2013, 06:50:59 AM »
have a english bitter on tap. force carbed for 3 days at 30psi then droped it to 8psi beer comes out a little to foamy if you are not carefull with the pour. tried dropping it all the way to 3psi and not much differance. took it back to 8psi currently, im thinking i either have to long of beer line or too short. this is a new system and id like to get it dialed in right from the start. if anyone can give me a place to go look up the formulas for beer line length and diameter verse pressure id appreciate it. (id beerline is 3/16 and 5 feet of line at 8psi with 3 1/2" shank running in a 36degree keezer if this helps)

The rule of thumb is a 2lb drop per 1' of 3/16" line.  So 5' of line should be okay on 8 psi.

My first guess (and that's all it is) is your keg is slightly over carbed.  You are serving at 8 psi but your keg is a little north of 10 psi.  Try shutting off the gas and venting the keg a couple of times over a few hours.  That will reduce the carb level in the keg and should straighten out your pour.  I've had to do this many times.

Paul
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2013, 07:04:47 AM »
My first guess (and that's all it is) is your keg is slightly over carbed.  You are serving at 8 psi but your keg is a little north of 10 psi.  Try shutting off the gas and venting the keg a couple of times over a few hours.  That will reduce the carb level in the keg and should straighten out your pour.  I've had to do this many times.

Paul

Agree completely.

Venting the keg a few times should get you where you want to be.
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Offline weithman5

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2013, 07:22:39 AM »
as above.  the regulator may be set at 8 psi but this acts kind of like a check valve. if you carbed the keg to 30 stablized and then reduce the regulator to 8, unless there is a temperature or volume change the keg is still at 30 psi. until you start drawing off.
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Offline bwana

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2013, 08:22:54 AM »
When this happens to me I take the in line off the keg and pour from the keg pressure. When you need the presure turn your line to 5psi. Your keg will balance out in a few days. Venting is also good.

Offline skyler

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 03:46:04 PM »
IME, 8' is the shortest you can have with any consistency. Some beers are foamier than others and need more back-pressure to pour right. My kegerator came with 5' lines and everything was foamy-poured for almost 2 years. Once I switched to 8' lines, I was finally able to consistently pour moderately-carbonated beer.

Offline aschecte

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 06:04:08 PM »
I have a similar post going on right now too... same problem as you excessive foaming and it's a PITA to say the least. From both this forum as well as HBT I have come to a few conclusions as well as facts. #1 fluid dynamics is very hard at least for me to comprehend #2 there is no consistency and any formula you find online is for commercial pouring at 1gal/min flow rates as speed is of an essence where as homebrewers it's more a matter of pride and we don't mind waiting the extra 5 seconds to fill a pint. the best advice I was given so far and I beliee this to be correct is to start longer than you think you need for example I am running as of today 13' per tap of 3/16" bevflex200 at 10 psi at 37-40 degrees if I just followed the math I only would hae needed 4-5' which would have been too short. I find that the pour is alright but a bit slow but not by much.... as I was told it's easier to shorten the length than to add more footage on. So I guess what i'm saying is use that 2-3psi reduction that 3/16" tube has a double what you actually think you need than shorten it gradually until the pour is perfect to your liking. I know this is not the most scientific approach but, I think it will save you a lot of headaches.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2013, 06:05:45 PM by aschecte »
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Offline Pi

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2013, 06:22:52 AM »
Guess i dont understand the relevance to the length if hose. Are we talking about the gas line or the line going to the tap? Fluid dynamics is one (of many) of my weak points. And what length should you use when filling bottles?
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2013, 06:44:32 AM »
Length of the gas line is irrelevant.  Length of the liquid line to the tap is important.  The longer the line, the further you have to push the beer (more resistance) which reduces pressure at the tap and gives you a nice pour.  To much pressure and the beer shoots out and you have a cup of foam.

Narrower lines should require less length.  Higher serving pressure requires more length. Etc. etc.

Starting long and reducing to what works for your system is the best way to go. 

If, for some reason, you need short lines you place epoxy mixers into the dip tube which creates resistance and allows a good pour with a minimal line.  There are a lot of threads on this if you google it.
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Offline aschecte

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2013, 07:00:50 AM »
Length of the gas line is irrelevant.  Length of the liquid line to the tap is important.  The longer the line, the further you have to push the beer (more resistance) which reduces pressure at the tap and gives you a nice pour.  To much pressure and the beer shoots out and you have a cup of foam.

Narrower lines should require less length.  Higher serving pressure requires more length. Etc. etc.

Starting long and reducing to what works for your system is the best way to go. 

If, for some reason, you need short lines you place epoxy mixers into the dip tube which creates resistance and allows a good pour with a minimal line.  There are a lot of threads on this if you google it.

Hind sight is 20/20 at least in my situation but, these epoxy mixers I've seen them in action and they work great but my fear has always been the food grade safety issue with these. Is there any links or info showing that the swizzle sticks don't leach any type of toxins ?
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2013, 07:28:08 AM »
I haven't seen any links related to toxins.  Good question.
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Offline Pi

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Re: beer line formula???
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2013, 08:12:43 AM »
Length of the gas line is irrelevant.  Length of the liquid line to the tap is important.  The longer the line, the further you have to push the beer (more resistance) which reduces pressure at the tap and gives you a nice pour.  To much pressure and the beer shoots out and you have a cup of foam.

Aha moment! This explains why my beer gun filler with its 2' beerline hose always produces so much foam. I'm gonna bottle a FC'bd AIPA using a longer hose and see how that works. Thanks, once again for clearing up that mystery.
Starting long and reducing to what works for your system is the best way to go.
My wife agrees!
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