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Second thoughts on brewing

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flbrewer:
As some of you have read, my first kit is arriving on Monday. I am feeling quite overwhelmed because I've realized that I will have to purchase some sort of propane burner as well as figure out a unique cooling solution for my wort (Florida warm water issue). I've actually considered (gasp) returning the kit. I have a passion for craft beer, but I'm wondering if I've prematurely gotten into this hobby. Am I over thinking my first brew? Thanks to everyone for the support so far.

sparkleberry:
relax. don't worry. have a (home) brew!

take delivery of the kit. make the beer. don't worry about a burner or big kettle or chiller. enjoy the process. it is simple and fun. take a step back and don't get caught up in advanced things before you've even brewed a single beer. it may not be perfect but, if you choose to move forward, learn from any and all mistakes. it's only beer.

RELAX. DON'T WORRY. HAVE A (HOME) BREW!

i didn't get a chiller until about beer number 8 or 9. and i didn't get a burner until further in on the process. you don't need these things to make beer. i have done 3 gallon biab batches on the stove top. don't feel like you need any single piece of equipment until you figure out your brewing process.

phunhog:
Just make a big ice bath and you will be good to go!!  My biggest piece of advice is to put your carboy/bucket into a water bath to try and maintain fermentation temps. It WILL make a ton of difference in your final beer. Have fun!!

euge:
Wait...

Why do you have to buy a burner or chiller? Perhaps what you should start with is a no-boil kit like a Coopers or Brewferm. What is most important is sanitation at key points and the proper fermentation temps: both which are easily achievable with a first try at making beer.

There is no reason you can't make 5 gallons of fabulous beer with an ordinary household 2 gallon stockpot in the kitchen. Can you explain why the kitchen stove is off limits? All you have to do is heat the water...

flbrewer:
Well it's not off limits, but boiling smelly wort for an hour on our gas range will most likely cause my better half to disapprove of my new hobby quickly. I assume using our nat gas range top would be much more expensive over propane. Lastly, I fear both a boil over and potentially damaging the range ( maybe what I've read is damage to glass top stoves).

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