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Considering next step

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klickitat jim:
I'm thinking about my next upgrade. Currently brewing one five gallon batch at a time with 8.5 gallon SS mash tun and boil kettle. Recently started doing two batches on brew day due to timing temps of lagers  in my two stage freezer fermentor chamber. In other words I want them to go D rest and chill to lager temps together. Anyway. ..

I've also heard the debate on sparge vs no sparge. It seems BIAB is resurrecting the idea that once upon a time our brewing ancestors did no sparge. Long story short I'm considering using my 8.5 pots for boil and adding another camp chef explorer dual burner, and two 14 gallon mash tuns. They would sit on a 16" platform behind my boilers. No lifting til its in fermentor :o

So for example, I would start with all the water in the tun. Heat to strike temp. Flame out. Stir in grain. Toss on my handy repurposed yoga mat insulator. Drain to the boil kettle, etc.

Cost is comfortable for me. I assume there will be an adjustment period as I learn efficiency of the system. If I have to up my grain bill a bit its no biggy.  What I gain is less lifting, especially hot liquor. And the big gain is doing two at a time.

Thoughts, comments?

"Friends don't let friends drink bad beer"

cornershot:
I like brewing 5 gallon batches rather than 10 gal or more because: 1. I like variety and 2. There's always something to learn and I can learn twice as much as someone who brews an equal volume in 10 gallon batches. I frequently do side by side 5 gallon biab batches. IME brewing 2 batches side by side can be a bit more hectic depending on the variables: cold weather, numerous hop additions, chilling, etc. If you stagger the batches by an hour or so, it will be mush easier to keep track of what's going on. Also, having two 8.5 gal kettles/tuns and two 14s, and 4 burners will give you the versatility in the future to do whatever you want: single 10 gal batches, big beers, parti gyle, 4 simultaneous biab's.     :D
Sounds good to me!

klickitat jim:
Thanks. I'm hoping it will have a positive effect on my Denny factor. Best beer, most fun, least work. Right now, waiting 90 minutes or so for the first batch to cool so I can drain the second batch... yuk.  Two at a time would rock.

I want to add a second freezer too for lagering.  Having one that can hold four fermentor at 50-70 and one for storing full cornys at 35-40 would be sweet

"Friends don't let friends drink bad beer"

Joe Sr.:
I've been doing two at a time for 10 years or more.  Not quite twice the work for twice the beer.  And more variety.  Sometimes I will do two of the same recipe and pitch different yeasts.

It can be hectic at times with different hop additions, but as long as I'm careful and don't start in on the homebrew too early there are no issues.

I use my stove top and do partial boils.  Someday I'll set up the turkey fryer and boil in the yard, but then I'll need two burners so I can continue doing two batches.

Slowbrew:

--- Quote from: klickitat jim on April 24, 2013, 07:41:00 AM ---Thanks. I'm hoping it will have a positive effect on my Denny factor. Best beer, most fun, least work. Right now, waiting 90 minutes or so for the first batch to cool so I can drain the second batch... yuk.  Two at a time would rock.

I want to add a second freezer too for lagering.  Having one that can hold four fermentor at 50-70 and one for storing full cornys at 35-40 would be sweet

"Friends don't let friends drink bad beer"

--- End quote ---

Do you have a chiller?  I do back to back brews most brew days and never have to wait 90 minutes for the first to cool down.  I use an immersion chiller to cool the first batch while I heat water and do a mash out on the second batch (I only have one burner).  My second mash of the day can get to be quite long but it seems to work for me.

I probably don't completely understand your setup but definitely would recommend a chiller as your next step if you don't already have one.

Paul

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