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Boiling question for propane burners

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flbrewer:

--- Quote from: morticaixavier on April 24, 2013, 11:50:24 AM ---I was going to add that, at least with my kettle, you can sort of tell when the temp of the kettle has reached equilibrium with the wort after flame out when the wort actually stops boiling. for me that takes maybe 30 seconds or so. so yeah a minute should be safe.

--- End quote ---
I'll just place my palm on the pot.

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: flbrewer on April 24, 2013, 11:51:19 AM ---Measuring evaporation would be tough for me to judge. Are you saying its doesn't need to be an explosive boil the whole time?

--- End quote ---

for sure not explosive. and you will learn your systems range of evaporation. think boiling pasta.

Slowbrew:

--- Quote from: morticaixavier on April 24, 2013, 11:53:16 AM ---
--- Quote from: flbrewer on April 24, 2013, 11:51:19 AM ---Measuring evaporation would be tough for me to judge. Are you saying its doesn't need to be an explosive boil the whole time?

--- End quote ---

for sure not explosive. and you will learn your systems range of evaporation. think boiling pasta.

--- End quote ---

A steady boil is plenty.  If you leave the gas on high you will quickly get introduced to what is called a boil over and have nice mess to clean up.  The wort is sugar loaded water that will stick/burn on every surface it runs out on to.  I had one happen last Saturday, in fact.  I was reading this forum instead of watching my brew.  luckily I have a power washer so clean up wasn't too much trouble.

One thing to remember is the pot will continue to absorb heat after you turn off the burner.  My stand will have some spots that are red hot after I turn off the gas.  That heat has to go somewhere so a lot of it gets  absorbed into your brew kettle.  Take the kettle off the burner and set it on the ground/patio/garage floor/deck(with a towel or something under it) and let it cool a bit there before you put in the plastic container.

Paul

flbrewer:

--- Quote from: a10t2 on April 24, 2013, 11:38:54 AM ---10-15% evaporation is plenty for what we're looking to accomplish in the boil. Any more than that and you're just wasting propane.

--- End quote ---

Just to clarify, would more evap. simply make less beer or is there another risk involved (taste, etc.) with increased evap. during boil? Thanks!

morticaixavier:

--- Quote from: flbrewer on April 24, 2013, 01:38:17 PM ---
--- Quote from: a10t2 on April 24, 2013, 11:38:54 AM ---10-15% evaporation is plenty for what we're looking to accomplish in the boil. Any more than that and you're just wasting propane.

--- End quote ---

Just to clarify, would more evap. simply make less beer or is there another risk involved (taste, etc.) with increased evap. during boil? Thanks!

--- End quote ---

less stronger beer. but if you hop a beer expecting say 4.5% abv and you end up with 6% abv the beer will taste quite different. Not as bitter and potentially unbalanced.

**EDIT TO ADD**
I sometimes intentionally do a very long boil with lots of evaporation on strong beers like barley wines because it will develop different flavours do to the longer boil. It is refered to as kettle carmelization although it is not really carmelization. The wort will get darker and sweeter and it can produce more raisiny dark fruit flavours.

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