Author Topic: Pressure Cookers  (Read 3878 times)

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7237
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Pressure Cookers
« on: March 01, 2010, 10:35:16 PM »
I'm on my third one. This one's all stainless. A Fagor Rapid Express.

Beans are done in minutes. Braised shortribs? Only 15 minutes. Amazing piece of cookware. :)
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline hokerer

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2634
  • Manassas, VA
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2010, 07:30:56 AM »
I'm on my third one. This one's all stainless. A Fagor Rapid Express.

Beans are done in minutes. Braised shortribs? Only 15 minutes. Amazing piece of cookware. :)

Mine's the big Presto.  Got it intially for canning wort for starters but have started to get into canning veggies and such.  Yes, amazing piece of cookware.
Joe

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8687
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2010, 07:36:35 AM »
I have one and never use it. No real good reason why I don't use it. I should break it out and use it once in a while.
Ron Price

Offline redbeerman

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1713
  • On the banks of the mighty Susquehanna
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2010, 11:41:12 AM »
We have a huge Presto pressure canner that my mom gave to me.  Things probably as old (~ 50) as I am or pretty darn close.
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

[441, 112.1deg] AR

Jim

Offline capozzoli

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1689
  • Lat 40* 6 m. 2.24 s. Long -74* 51 m. 21.75 s.
    • View Profile
    • Capozzoli Metalworks
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2010, 12:26:34 PM »
If it is really old it may not have a back up relief valve. Be careful. The old ones only have the rattle thing and if it clogs. Klah-bloy.

Pressure cookers are truly amazing. A very underrated kitchen tool. I could never live without my pressure cooker.

On the No Reservations Saudi Arabia episode they cook a whole camel in a giant pressure cooker.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us

Offline redbeerman

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1713
  • On the banks of the mighty Susquehanna
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2010, 01:11:30 PM »
If it is really old it may not have a back up relief valve. Be careful. The old ones only have the rattle thing and if it clogs. Klah-bloy.

Pressure cookers are truly amazing. A very underrated kitchen tool. I could never live without my pressure cooker.

On the No Reservations Saudi Arabia episode they cook a whole camel in a giant pressure cooker.

Cap, it does not have a secondary relief valve only the rattle thing on top.  Must be careful not to make split pea soup in it. ;)
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

[441, 112.1deg] AR

Jim

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8687
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2010, 02:27:26 PM »
If it is really old it may not have a back up relief valve. Be careful. The old ones only have the rattle thing and if it clogs. Klah-bloy.

Pressure cookers are truly amazing. A very underrated kitchen tool. I could never live without my pressure cooker.

On the No Reservations Saudi Arabia episode they cook a whole camel in a giant pressure cooker.

Must be careful not to make split pea soup in it. ;)

...or else  ;D

Ron Price

Offline Jeff Renner

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 66
  • Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2010, 06:05:48 AM »
A pressure cooker can speed up decoction or pseudo-decoction, too, although with the ramp-up to temperature and the cool-down period (don't open the valve or run water on the cooker or you will get boil-up in the grains) may make the time about the same.

But there are other advantages.  Because you don't put the grains directly in the pot (they would scorch; you put them in a smaller pot or bowl) you don't have to stir to avoid scorching the way you normally would.

The pressure cooking also produces more intense malt flavors (melanoidins).  For me, this is the big advantage.

I like to use this method for cereal mashing corn or rice* and for pseudo-decoction, in which about 1/3 of the grain bill is briefly mashed separately, the boiled before being added to the main mash.  I have an article in the current Zymurgy with more details about this technique as well as a recipe for a killer Munich Dunkel using it.

* see http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/0000/1298/SOzym00-Pilsner.pdf
AHA Member since 1980, Life Member
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild charter member (1986)
AHA Governing Committee (2002 - 2011)
BJCP since 1991, National
"One never knows, do one?"  Fats Waller, American Musician, 1904-1943

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8687
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2010, 08:15:07 AM »
A pressure cooker can speed up decoction or pseudo-decoction, too, although with the ramp-up to temperature and the cool-down period (don't open the valve or run water on the cooker or you will get boil-up in the grains) may make the time about the same.

But there are other advantages.  Because you don't put the grains directly in the pot (they would scorch; you put them in a smaller pot or bowl) you don't have to stir to avoid scorching the way you normally would.

The pressure cooking also produces more intense malt flavors (melanoidins).  For me, this is the big advantage.

I like to use this method for cereal mashing corn or rice* and for pseudo-decoction, in which about 1/3 of the grain bill is briefly mashed separately, the boiled before being added to the main mash.  I have an article in the current Zymurgy with more details about this technique as well as a recipe for a killer Munich Dunkel using it.

* see http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/0000/1298/SOzym00-Pilsner.pdf

Very informative article. Thanks!
Ron Price

Offline nicneufeld

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1049
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2010, 10:01:02 AM »
Maybe I'll get one of these someday.  Big among Indians, who cook a lot of split lentils.  However, lately I just enjoy cooking and the long time it takes dal to cook in a normal pot gives me time to enjoy other things I'm preparing, so I feel no reason to speed the process.

It was funny, I was at the Indian grocer last night and I was hoping to find a nice looking traditional kadhai/karahi (Indian wok) and I asked the proprietor.  He points them out to me and they are all extremely normal looking, modern style non-stick pots.  I was thinking something cast iron or more, well, Indian looking, I admit.  I am shallow.  I didn't buy any of them.

Offline capozzoli

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1689
  • Lat 40* 6 m. 2.24 s. Long -74* 51 m. 21.75 s.
    • View Profile
    • Capozzoli Metalworks
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2010, 12:46:29 PM »
Yeah I have some of those indian woks. I like them more for serving than cooking. The bottom is made to go on top of a small wood fired stove. Or special ring that sits on the stove top. I get tme at my Indian grocer who has a whole isle of cooking stuff. They have the imitation flat bottom non stick ones too.

They have a few of those Indian woks there that look like they are in the 50-100 gallon range. massive.

Lots of pressure cookers there too.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

http://theholyravioli.blogspot.com/

http:// www.thecapo.us

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7237
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2010, 11:59:42 PM »
The advantages of using a PC are less fuel, less heat generated withing the house and less time. I can see why they are so popular in India. Their recipe times go by whistles- evidently their PC's will whistle when certain pressures are reached.

There's nothing wrong with jiggle-tops as long as there's a relief valve. Cooking with a jiggle-top PC is a real art form but they cook just as good. I still have an aluminum one that can be pressed into service.

I've often wondered about using one to do a decoction. Hmm may have to try as suggested.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline dean

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 922
  • Me and Hayden, my newest grandson.
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2010, 06:44:45 AM »
A pressure cooker can speed up decoction or pseudo-decoction, too, although with the ramp-up to temperature and the cool-down period (don't open the valve or run water on the cooker or you will get boil-up in the grains) may make the time about the same.

But there are other advantages.  Because you don't put the grains directly in the pot (they would scorch; you put them in a smaller pot or bowl) you don't have to stir to avoid scorching the way you normally would.

The pressure cooking also produces more intense malt flavors (melanoidins).  For me, this is the big advantage.

I like to use this method for cereal mashing corn or rice* and for pseudo-decoction, in which about 1/3 of the grain bill is briefly mashed separately, the boiled before being added to the main mash.  I have an article in the current Zymurgy with more details about this technique as well as a recipe for a killer Munich Dunkel using it.

* see http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/0000/1298/SOzym00-Pilsner.pdf

I liked your article in the recent issue of Zymurgy, I'm going to try it.   ;D  I like making starter wort with the PC for the reasons posted by Euge too.

Offline MDixon

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1012
    • View Profile
    • Mike's Homebrewing Page
Re: Pressure Cookers
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2010, 05:12:43 AM »
We have a Presto for cooking and had to replace the gasket a few years ago. Not the easiest part to obtain as it turns out.

You really cannot beat and All American for larger chores. Check out this mama jamma http://www.pressurecooker-outlet.com/941.htm
Mine is a puppy sized compared to that at either 21 or 25 qt, I cannot remember which at the moment. Mine is also old as the hills.
It's not a popularity contest, it's beer!