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Best Way to 'Dry Adjunct'

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mpietropaoli:
Cross posting on another forum, but there is just some great experience on here, so here goes:

The aroma coming off of my witbier after chilling was absolutely sublime. Citrusy, fruity, little wheaty malt...I wanted to keep this aroma around so bad I ran to a buddy's house to get some fermcap, hoping it would minimize my amazing aromas blowing off. It didn't. My ferm chamber has smelled amazing for the last 5 days, and my beer doesn't.

Was thinking of adding some more chamomile (and maybe more zest, though it seems this is easy to overdo) in a muslin bag. I usually add dry hops during the last third of fermentation to the primary and don't worry about infection since the yeast is so active and the presence of alcohol.

I would be a little uncomfortable adding chamomile and ESPECIALLY citrus zest, since the skin of fruit is so full of nasties. Any recommendations? Maybe just spray them with star-san? add them to boiling water, immediately cover, boil for 1-2 minutes, remove from heat, cool and add the whole thing to the fermenter?

The yeast is still a bit active, as I've raised the temp up from my pitch and initial ferment temp of 66 (up to 70, then 72 today), but I seem to have reached a final gravity (1.011 off of 1.048).  It could also just be off-gassing taking away more of my precious aroma.

troybinso:
Not sure what to say about the difference between the fermenting aromas and the actual smell of the beer, but if you want to add some spices post fermentation a good way to sanitize them is too soak them in a strong alcohol like everclear.

reverseapachemaster:

--- Quote from: troybinso on April 29, 2013, 07:34:47 PM ---Not sure what to say about the difference between the fermenting aromas and the actual smell of the beer, but if you want to add some spices post fermentation a good way to sanitize them is too soak them in a strong alcohol like everclear.

--- End quote ---

I would also do this.

tschmidlin:
This might be what they mean above, but for the zest I would soak it in alcohol and then either add the whole tincture or strain out the zest and add the alcohol.  You can dose to taste at packaging.  This is also a good way to make citrus vodka if you are so inclined. 

For the chamomile, I would boil it and make a tea and do the same as above.  You could add the tea to the fermenter without worrying much, but getting the dose right could be a pain and you'd have to taste it frequently to rack it when the level hits what you want.

kylekohlmorgen:

--- Quote from: tschmidlin on April 29, 2013, 11:12:01 PM ---This might be what they mean above, but for the zest I would soak it in alcohol and then either add the whole tincture or strain out the zest and add the alcohol.  You can dose to taste at packaging.  This is also a good way to make citrus vodka if you are so inclined. 

For the chamomile, I would boil it and make a tea and do the same as above.  You could add the tea to the fermenter without worrying much, but getting the dose right could be a pain and you'd have to taste it frequently to rack it when the level hits what you want.

--- End quote ---

Agreed on both parts here.

With any material added in secondary, the tincture is a great alternative to adding the raw ingredient. You can dose to taste, you don't have to worry about contact time in the finished beer, and you reduce risk of extracting unwanted flavors.

Ever since ruining a batch of Christmas beer with a boquet garni in the keg, I've stuck to a tincture for spices, citrus zest, and herbs. The only thing I haven't tried is hops!

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