Author Topic: % of Munich for light summer ale  (Read 5990 times)

Offline goschman

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Re: % of Munich for light summer ale
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2013, 01:57:25 PM »
What was the other 10%?

5% light crystal, 5% flaked oats

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: % of Munich for light summer ale
« Reply #31 on: July 17, 2013, 02:15:25 PM »
Right on. I've gotten to where I like crystal 10 quite a bit. The darker stuff not so much

Offline goschman

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Re: % of Munich for light summer ale
« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2013, 02:22:55 PM »
Yeah I am trying to find the balance I like between the maltiness of Munich and the sweetness of crystal. I don't know why but I never use anything darker than C60. This was such a light beer that the balance seemed good but it was hard to tell...

Offline garc_mall

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Re: % of Munich for light summer ale
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2013, 03:16:10 PM »
I ended up using 15% Munich because the brew shop was out of regular 2 row and I was afraid the alternative would make it too malty. I went with 75% pale ale malt and 15% Munich. I plan to brew this again soon where I will go with my original plan of 20%.

I had really poor efficiency on this batch and higher than anticipated attenuation. It had a bit of a watery mouthfeel that seemed to get better with time.

So I see the Hoppy/Malty continuum to be really a grid. You have a continuum (I like to use the Y axis for this) for Sweet/Bitter. You have another continuum of Malty/Hoppy. You can have a malty beer that isn't sweet (Think Munich Dunkels/Pilsners), and you can have a Hoppy beer that isn't very bitter (See a lot of the newer West Coast APA's).

I love Munich in that it adds maltiness without sweetness. I think it can really add some flavor complexity to hoppy beers without making them cloying (This is why my American Amber is 50/50 Munich/2-row).

Also, a higher mash temp helps with both conversion (better gelatinization) and lower attenuation. Unless it was some sort of aberration, I would bump up the rest temp 2-3 degrees next time.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison