Author Topic: Starsan temp.  (Read 2174 times)

Offline wckedpete

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Starsan temp.
« on: May 02, 2013, 07:31:36 AM »
Has anyone ever heard that starsan is ineffective at higher temps? I have Been home brewing for a while and never heard anything and have used it with hot water. I have been working at a brewery for a little over a month and one of the other brewers told me that starsan doesn't work at high temps. I went to the starsan website and the only heat info talks about toxic gases given off at high heat during fire conditions. I rarely use starsan in fire so I am not that worried about it. The temp I was using it at was about 180 deg. Let me know what you know.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2013, 07:45:17 AM »
I know that idophor is not recommended to be used at high temp because it causes the active ingredient to off gas much much faster. Don't know that it would matter with star san though.
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Offline wckedpete

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2013, 08:52:32 AM »
Yeah, I want to know what happens to starsan.

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2013, 11:03:35 AM »
I'd ask Five Star - their product support address is support@fivestarchemicals.com
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2013, 07:08:08 AM »
Acid solutions are usually more active at higher temperatures.  You may want to keep the temperature below 150 if possible though, the acids may evolve out of solution as you get closer to boiling temps.  Proper ventilation is never a bad thing.  You may have noticed that when you are heating sparge water, for instance, that bubbles form and steam starts evolving far before reaching the boiling point.
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Offline wckedpete

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2013, 08:12:44 AM »
Ok, so I found out the reason to not use starsan at high temps. The reason is that at higher temps, you will actually lower the pH of your solution. So instead of being at say 9 or so pH at room temp. You will actually be closer to 7 at a higher temp. ( this was just an example)

Offline SecondRow_Sean

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2013, 08:47:32 AM »
Ok, so I found out the reason to not use starsan at high temps. The reason is that at higher temps, you will actually lower the pH of your solution. So instead of being at say 9 or so pH at room temp. You will actually be closer to 7 at a higher temp. ( this was just an example)

Isn't a proper Star San ph below 3?

Offline redbeerman

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2013, 08:55:12 AM »
Ok, so I found out the reason to not use starsan at high temps. The reason is that at higher temps, you will actually lower the pH of your solution. So instead of being at say 9 or so pH at room temp. You will actually be closer to 7 at a higher temp. ( this was just an example)

Isn't a proper Star San ph below 3?

Yep.  and lowering the pH will only make it more active.  This could be a problem if you are using it in aluminum for instance, but SST will be able to handle it (the process is called passivation).  The pH probably won't get low enough for that though.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2013, 09:00:07 AM by redbeerman »
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Offline wckedpete

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2013, 01:46:04 PM »
Correct, Starsan is an acid. Everything from my last post, switch it around. The pH goes up making it neutral.

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2013, 06:04:28 AM »
Where did you find the answer?

- Sent by my R2 unit

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Offline macbrews

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2013, 07:29:48 PM »
Yep.  and lowering the pH will only make it more active.  This could be a problem if you are using it in aluminum for instance, but SST will be able to handle it (the process is called passivation).  The pH probably won't get low enough for that though.
[/quote]

So when I add 40 ccs instead of 30 cc for 5 gallons, is that making it more acidic?

So is more better?

Offline Wesbrau

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2013, 08:51:49 PM »
At killing organisms, probably.  But then it may no longer be a no rinse sanitizer   
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Offline mpmccann

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2013, 10:09:58 AM »
What if you refrigerate Starsan? The only reason I ask is I've been known to keep some in a keg in my keg fridge. This is to reuse later and I have even put it on an empty tap before, for easy use when needed. So would low temp say beer serving temps adversely affect the PH?   
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 03:59:56 PM by mpmccann »
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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2013, 10:11:21 AM »
At killing organisms, probably.  But then it may no longer be a no rinse sanitizer

Yep.  At NHC I was talking to Jim from Five Star and told him I mixed it stronger to get the pH down.  He said that at stronger concentrations it's no longer no rinse.
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Offline macbrews

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Re: Starsan temp.
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2013, 03:43:20 PM »
At killing organisms, probably.  But then it may no longer be a no rinse sanitizer

Yep.  At NHC I was talking to Jim from Five Star and told him I mixed it stronger to get the pH down.  He said that at stronger concentrations it's no longer no rinse.

Because of flavor issues or pH issues?  Seems like any remaining volume would still be diluted out so much that it would have a negligible affect on the pH of your final volume of beer in the fermentation vessel.

So at what mixture do I need to be concerned?