Author Topic: Considering a smaller kettle  (Read 413 times)

Offline FLbrewer

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Considering a smaller kettle
« on: May 05, 2013, 07:47:10 PM »
Brewed today with a 10 gallon SS kettle and it was BIG. I'm considering downsizing to a 5 gallon kettle as nothing came close to a boil over with about 3 gallons of wort.
Besides making more beer, is there an advantage to doing a full boil as far as quality of beer goes? Thanks.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Considering a smaller kettle
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 08:23:33 PM »
Brewed today with a 10 gallon SS kettle and it was BIG. I'm considering downsizing to a 5 gallon kettle as nothing came close to a boil over with about 3 gallons of wort.
Besides making more beer, is there an advantage to doing a full boil as far as quality of beer goes? Thanks.

it means a lower gravity so you get better utilization from the hops. Less darkening of the wort. If you decide to go all grain at some point you will need to do full boils and a 10 gallon kettle is ideal for 5 gallon all grain Brew In A Bag (BIAB) batch.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Considering a smaller kettle
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2013, 04:53:14 AM »
Brewed today with a 10 gallon SS kettle and it was BIG. I'm considering downsizing to a 5 gallon kettle as nothing came close to a boil over with about 3 gallons of wort.
Besides making more beer, is there an advantage to doing a full boil as far as quality of beer goes? Thanks.

it means a lower gravity so you get better utilization from the hops. Less darkening of the wort. If you decide to go all grain at some point you will need to do full boils and a 10 gallon kettle is ideal for 5 gallon all grain Brew In A Bag (BIAB) batch.
+1.  Keep the pot. When the time comes that you're ready to jump to all-grain, you'll be boiling ~7 gallons of wort down to 5, and you'll be glad you spent the money up front.  With that pot, I would go full wort from now on, even if you do extract or partial mash batches for awhile. You won't cool quite as quick but the overall beer quality will make up for it.
Jon H.