Author Topic: British Yeast Recommendation  (Read 4940 times)

Offline gogreen437

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British Yeast Recommendation
« on: May 08, 2013, 07:01:25 PM »
I am looking for a good British ale yeast that is fruity, is known to leave some diacetyl in the beer, but isn't over too over the top. 

Offline dordway29

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 07:08:41 PM »
Wyeast 1968 london esb is fun.

Offline hoser

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 07:39:05 PM »
Why would you ever choose a yeast that leaves diacetyl in beer?  I am very sensitive to diacetyl and hate finding it in my beers.

That being said, for English beers I like Wy1469 West Yorkshire.  Good all around work horse at a variety of temps, floccs well, good fruity profile, but sadly no diacetyl (which in my opinion is a good thing :P)

Personally, I would avoid a yeast that creates a butter bomb.  But, that is the BJCP judge in me.  To each their own I suppose...

Offline gmac

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 08:23:16 PM »
WLP007 and a stick of butter.

Or Ringwood.

Offline Three

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2013, 09:16:04 PM »
I'm with dordway29 on this, and it has become my favorite. 

It won't disappoint!


Wyeast....

YEAST STRAIN: 1968  |  London ESB Ale™

A very good cask conditioned ale strain, this extremely flocculant yeast produces distinctly malty beers. Attenuation levels are typically less than most other yeast strains which results in a slightly sweeter finish. Ales produced with this strain tend to be fruity, increasingly so with higher fermentation temperatures of 70-74°F (21-23° C). A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete. Bright beers are easily achieved within days without any filtration.

Origin:
Flocculation: Very High
Attenuation: 67-71%
Temperature Range: 64-72F, 18-22C
Alcohol Tolerance: 9% ABV


Or White Labs....

WLP002 English Ale Yeast

A classic ESB strain from one of England's largest independent breweries. This yeast is best suited for English style ales including milds, bitters, porters, and English style stouts. This yeast will leave a beer very clear, and will leave some residual sweetness.

Attenuation:
63-70%
Flocculation:
Very High
Optimum Ferment Temp:
65-68°F
Alcohol Tolerance:
Medium



Enjoy your brew(ing)!


Anyone who sings a tune so sweet is passin by........

Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2013, 04:22:03 AM »
@southhousebrew

Indianapolis, IN

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http://southhousepilotbrewery.blogspot.com/

Offline davidgzach

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2013, 05:53:43 AM »
Dave Zach

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2013, 06:49:30 AM »
I have to agree on the ESB yeast.  It's my current non-Belgian favorite.

I'd also like a good dry yeast substitute.  I am not a fan of Nottingham.  I've not used S-04 that I can recall, but I believe it may be similar to the ESB yeast.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline erockrph

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2013, 08:18:33 AM »
I have to agree on the ESB yeast.  It's my current non-Belgian favorite.

I'd also like a good dry yeast substitute.  I am not a fan of Nottingham.  I've not used S-04 that I can recall, but I believe it may be similar to the ESB yeast.

Yep, S-04 rocks just as hard as 1968. Tastes great, ferments like a champ and drops like a sack of bricks when it's done.
Eric B.

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Offline swampale

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2013, 04:50:33 AM »
i just don't like the bready flavour you get from S-04. I did taste a homebrewed Stout that was brewed with S-04 and didn't taste any of that bready flavour.

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2013, 05:33:28 AM »
Ones that I use.
1968/002, the Fuller's strain.
1469 for my Timothy Taylor Clone attempts.
022 Essex ale is a good change of pace when it is out.
1275 also can make some nice bitter.
1028 works for high gravity beers.
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Online Joe Sr.

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2013, 06:57:40 AM »
I pitched 1968 in a stout last night and it's rocking this morning!

I grew the starter up from some slurry from last November.  Love that yeast!
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2013, 07:35:54 AM »
i just don't like the bready flavour you get from S-04. I did taste a homebrewed Stout that was brewed with S-04 and didn't taste any of that bready flavour.

I've been using S-04 as my house yeast for a little while now. It doesn't always have to give you that yeast character. Personally I like some yeast character in my English beers so I do ferment those around 66-68F. American beer styles don't need that character so I ferment those with S-04 at 62-64F (usually ramping up from 62 to 64) and it comes out really clean.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing but I'm also a lawyer: The Kielich Law Firm

Offline cheshirecat

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2013, 09:24:13 AM »
I use WLP002 in my lighter english beers and WLP013 London in my darker english styles (stout, porter, mild).

Offline chumley

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Re: British Yeast Recommendation
« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2013, 09:31:28 AM »
Another vote for 1968 aka Fuller's yeast, as it best fits the bill for what the OP is looking for.

I, too, like a little diacetyl in a couple of styles, like British bitter and Bohemian Pilsner.  Not so much for the hint of butter, but the slick mouthfeel can enhance the body of what could be a thin beer.

Also, another vote for the Ringwood yeast.  Brew a nice 1.040 bitter with it, then use the yeast cake for a Baltic Porter or Russian Imperial Stout.  You can't go wrong.