Author Topic: dry hoping and crashing  (Read 1311 times)

Offline hulkavitch

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dry hoping and crashing
« on: May 12, 2013, 11:04:33 AM »
Can I dry hop and cold crash at the same time? What effects will it have if any on the finished product?

Offline nateo

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Re: dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2013, 11:17:09 AM »
There has been a lot of discussion of dry hopping temperatures lately. The general idea seems to be that colder dry hopping brings out more grassy/vegetal flavors. I think you'd be better off dry hopping at room temp, then cold crashing.
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Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2013, 11:19:47 AM »
I can't recall ever noticing negative effects from dry hopping at cold temps.  However, my new procedure is to cold crash before dry hopping (maybe even xfer to secondary) to minimize interaction between the yeast and the hops that could result in undesirable flavors.
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dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2013, 11:51:39 AM »
I can't recall ever noticing negative effects from dry hopping at cold temps.  However, my new procedure is to cold crash before dry hopping (maybe even xfer to secondary) to minimize interaction between the yeast and the hops that could result in undesirable flavors.

I just can't believe you never had the grassy flavors from dry hopping cold. Really? I do agree that it is best to get as much yeast out of the beer as possible before dry hopping, because as the yeast drops out it grabs some of the yeast with it. But, without a doubt, dry hopping in the 60-70 degree range works best for me.
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Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2013, 11:55:39 AM »
I just can't believe you never had the grassy flavors from dry hopping cold. Really? I do agree that it is best to get as much yeast out of the beer as possible before dry hopping, because as the yeast drops out it grabs some of the yeast with it. But, without a doubt, dry hopping in the 60-70 degree range works best for me.

I"m going by my process of kegging the beer with dry hops, then throwing it in the fridge.  Either no grassy flavors, or I like them so I don't notice them.  :)  I'm basing my new practice of trying to remove as much yeast as possible before dry hopping on Stan's article in the latest Zymurgy.  I recently dry hopped and IPA with Simcoe and Amarillo and got a weird, almost rose scented aroma.  Not what I expected from that hop combo.  That's the kind of interaction between yeast and hops that Stan talked about.  When I read it I realized that the beer still had a fair amount of yeast in it when I dry hopped.
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dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2013, 12:11:11 PM »
Never had the "rose" you are mentioning. I have had a beer that was intensely hoppy on the nose and was cloudy, then watched the beer clear brilliantly and lose much of the aroma, then moved keg or shook up yeast and had the aroma return.
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Offline joe_feist

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Re: dry hoping and crashing
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2013, 09:46:41 AM »
I've dropped my last several batches in a secondary. Took some ideas from Steele's book, "IPA." Been using about 6-7 ozs hops in the dry hop; about that on the last 2-3 minutes of the boil and only an ounce in the boil. OK, I described that backwards. :o. Anyway, haven't tried dry hopping cold. I do like the increased aroma and flavor from the late additions in the secondary at cellar temp (roughly 64-66 in my basement before spring hit.
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