General Category > Equipment and Software

Those little red cans of Oxygen

<< < (2/10) > >>

mabrungard:
I easily get 15 to 20 batches per bottle, but I use an in-line aerator setup and infuse the wort slowly.  I also make a 1.5 L starter for ales and 3 L starter for lagers, so my need for oxygenation may be slightly less urgent than those who underpitch.  I typically see activity within 4 hours.

micsager:

--- Quote from: mabrungard on May 16, 2013, 02:32:47 PM ---I easily get 15 to 20 batches per bottle, but I use an in-line aerator setup and infuse the wort slowly.  I also make a 1.5 L starter for ales and 3 L starter for lagers, so my need for oxygenation may be slightly less urgent than those who underpitch.  I typically see activity within 4 hours.

--- End quote ---

I'm pitching plenty of yeast, From what others are saying I just have it turned up WAY TOO HIGH..... 8)

dak0415:
Whatever bubbles up to the surface is essentially wasted.  Bubbles should barely disturb the surface.  I give most beers 2 minutes and get 15-20 beers (10gal) per bottle.

Thirsty_Monk:
Mic,

Can you just get oxygen in 5lb bottles?
Or just stay away from oxygen all together.

klickitat jim:
I have read some dissolved oxygen info. Haven't bought into the idea for homebrew level yet. One side by side study I saw had three one gallon bottles of identical wort and yeast. One was not aerated at all, one was shook for two minutes, one was oxygenated for two minutes. All three made beer. The non aeration was slow and obviously under attenuated. The shook one started faster than the O2 one but the shook and O2 samples finished about the same.

I don't shake, I pour back and forth between buckets until the froth reaches the brim. Takes about three pours, less than a minute. There may be some science that proves O2 is better, but my low tech method works plenty good for me. Plus one less expense and piece of equipment to clean.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version