Author Topic: kolsch grain bill  (Read 2139 times)

Offline goschman

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kolsch grain bill
« on: May 29, 2013, 08:43:18 AM »
From what I can tell from BJCP guidelins, a Kolsch shold be most if not all is Pilsner or Pale with up to 20% wheat being acceptable. I would like to keep it simple but would also like to use a bit of wheat. Would 90% Pilsner, 10% wheat be ok for this style?

Offline gmac

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2013, 08:47:41 AM »
I've medaled with that blend before.

Offline dordway29

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2013, 08:55:10 AM »
It sure would. Mine was 94% pils and 6% wheat. The important part is using the best quality pilsner available to you. And a big starter with good fermentation at around 60F. One of my favorite beers to make.
I've also taken first with this recipe and recently had the chance to brew it "professionally" at a local brewery.

Weyermann Pilsner 94%
Weyermann Pale Wheat 6%

.5oz magnum 60
.75oz hallertau 20

german ale

mash at 149F and I fermented mine at 56F
OG: 1.045
TG: 1.008

Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2013, 08:57:51 AM »
Thanks guys. I am thinking about putting a twist on it by using american hops for flavor and aroma. For yeast, I was planning on Wyeast Kolsch but haven't really considered using the German Ale. I will investigate a bit as I am hoping to find something pretty flocculant.

Offline Pinski

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2013, 09:28:43 AM »
Thanks guys. I am thinking about putting a twist on it by using american hops for flavor and aroma. For yeast, I was planning on Wyeast Kolsch but haven't really considered using the German Ale. I will investigate a bit as I am hoping to find something pretty flocculant.
I just did a split batch using WY2565 and WLP029, I found the WLP029 to be much more flocculant at the end of fermentation.
Thank you BEER!

Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2013, 09:51:31 AM »
IME The Wyeast strain needs some lagering time. That will give you plenty of time to clear the beer up.

If you're making a kolsch and not using a kolsch yeast... aren't you just making a cream ale?
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Offline Pinski

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2013, 09:56:29 AM »
IME The Wyeast strain needs some lagering time. That will give you plenty of time to clear the beer up.

If you're making a kolsch and not using a kolsch yeast... aren't you just making a cream ale?

That's kind of what I was thinking.
Thank you BEER!

Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2013, 10:07:09 AM »
IME The Wyeast strain needs some lagering time. That will give you plenty of time to clear the beer up.

If you're making a kolsch and not using a kolsch yeast... aren't you just making a cream ale?

Wyeast German ale appears to have very similar characteristics according to their website. I don't see why this couldn't be used to make a Kolsch especially with a month of lagering. That being said I would probably just go with the Kolsch yeast.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 10:43:58 AM by goschman »

Offline udubdawg

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2013, 10:09:38 AM »
That grain bill is fine.
I use 75/25 Pilsner/Kolsch malt with 029. 

Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2013, 10:46:03 AM »
That grain bill is fine.
I use 75/25 Pilsner/Kolsch malt with 029.

I have never seen Kolsch malt until now. Would Vienna be a reasonable substitute especially in smaller quantities?

Offline jeffy

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2013, 10:47:43 AM »
That grain bill is fine.
I use 75/25 Pilsner/Kolsch malt with 029.

I have never seen Kolsch malt until now. Would Vienna be a reasonable substitute especially in smaller quantities?

yeah, what is Kolsch malt?
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Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2013, 10:52:51 AM »
That grain bill is fine.
I use 75/25 Pilsner/Kolsch malt with 029.

I have never seen Kolsch malt until now. Would Vienna be a reasonable substitute especially in smaller quantities?

yeah, what is Kolsch malt?

I found this on Northern Brewer:
4.5° L. From a maltster co-op based in Osthofen, near Köln, this malt is used by some of the brewpubs in that city to make their trademark ale. Kölsch malt has a light, sweet and extremely "German" flavor and aroma with a little bit of biscuit character. We've had good results using a multi-temp step mash with Kölsch malt, but a single infusion — although not traditional — works as well. Style nerds please take note: the maltster rates the color of this malt at 9 EBC. If you use 100% Kölsch malt for the grist of a Kölsch, you will be within spec according to Eric Warner's Kölsch (7-14 EBC, or 3.5-7 SRM — p. 51), but definitely on the dark end of the BJCP guidelines. If you are brewing for a competition, you may want to incorporate some pils or wheat malt into the grain bill to dilute the color.

Offline majorvices

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kolsch grain bill
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2013, 11:13:50 AM »
You can go as simple as all pils. If you want it to taste like a kolch, use a kolsch yeast (the German ale is an Alt yeast, doesn't have the kolsch tastes). Don't use American "C" hops unless you want it to taste like a blonde or pale ale. "Noble type" hops like Mt. hood or crystal or sterling, etc. will be fine (though mittlefrue is best).
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Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2013, 11:21:10 AM »
You can go as simple as all pils. If you want it to taste like a kolch, use a kolsch yeast (the German ale is an Alt yeast, doesn't have the kolsch tastes). Don't use American "C" hops unless you want it to taste like a blonde or pale ale. "Noble type" hops like Mt. hood or crystal or sterling, etc. will be fine (though mittlefrue is best).

Got ya. Yeah I guess if I was to use American hops then it just becomes a blonde ale even with the Kolsch yeast. I don't really stick to many guidelines so I see the issue...

Offline guido

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2013, 11:42:34 AM »
That grain bill is fine.
I use 75/25 Pilsner/Kolsch malt with 029.

I have never seen Kolsch malt until now. Would Vienna be a reasonable substitute especially in smaller quantities?

I use 95% Pils and 5% Vienna, hop with Hallertau for about 30 IBU.  Ferment with the Wyeast 2575 Kolsch II yeast at about 58F.  I lager for about a month.  Tastes great.
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