Author Topic: kolsch grain bill  (Read 2147 times)

Offline denny

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2013, 11:56:02 AM »
IME The Wyeast strain needs some lagering time. That will give you plenty of time to clear the beer up.

If you're making a kolsch and not using a kolsch yeast... aren't you just making a cream ale?

Wyeast German ale appears to have very similar characteristics according to their website. I don't see why this couldn't be used to make a Kolsch especially with a month of lagering. That being said I would probably just go with the Kolsch yeast.

The Wyeast 1007 German ale and 2565 Kolsch yeasts are very different.  1007 is very clean.  2565 has a slight fruity, winey character to it that I think of as typical for Kolsch.
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Online morticaixavier

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2013, 11:57:39 AM »
I use the WLP029 which is White labs kolsch offering, they do call it a german ale yeast though.

My grain bill is mostly pils with munich for character. Hallertauer at FWH and 60 minutes. for middle of the style IBUS
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Offline goschman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2013, 12:13:57 PM »
Thanks for the yeast info. I get confused when the yeast sites say that you can use certain yeasts for a particular style when that is not the case. For Kolsch, Wyeast recommends 2565, 1007, or 1010

Offline gmac

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2013, 06:02:36 PM »
I haven't used all the Kolsch yeasts but the Wyeast Kolsch (not Kolsch II although that's in the fridge) does take a long to time to floc out and I did a re-pitch recently that never cleared despite Irish Moss and gelatin.  Not sure if it was another issue or I just selected for less floculant yeast but it tasted fine but after 3 months I just drank it cloudy.  I don't believe you can run a Kolsch through as quick as other styles and need some lagering time to clear.

Offline majorvices

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kolsch grain bill
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2013, 05:30:39 AM »
The wlp029 is a bit more challenging to make clear but with some finings and cold conditioning you can get it pretty close to crystal clear (see my avatar, left). That said, the grist bill is so pale and sans buffers so you really need to watch your pH. Calcium chloride additions and a food grade acid may help improve your clarity drastically depending on your water.
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Offline Pinski

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2013, 09:10:55 AM »
The wlp029 is a bit more challenging to make clear but with some finings and cold conditioning you can get it pretty close to crystal clear (see my avatar, left). That said, the grist bill is so pale and sans buffers so you really need to watch your pH. Calcium chloride additions and a food grade acid may help improve your clarity drastically depending on your water.
+1 Bru'n Water prescribed additions have worked well for my beers and they've been coming out brilliantly clear.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: kolsch grain bill
« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2013, 06:46:04 AM »
The wlp029 is a bit more challenging to make clear but with some finings and cold conditioning you can get it pretty close to crystal clear (see my avatar, left). That said, the grist bill is so pale and sans buffers so you really need to watch your pH. Calcium chloride additions and a food grade acid may help improve your clarity drastically depending on your water.
+1 Bru'n Water prescribed additions have worked well for my beers and they've been coming out brilliantly clear.
+2  on both.  I think WLP029 gives a proper vinous character to the finished product.
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