Author Topic: Why hot break?  (Read 2133 times)

Offline wactuary

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 28
    • View Profile
Why hot break?
« on: June 01, 2013, 06:22:54 PM »
Boiling up a starter and watching a pot, waiting for it to boil. Gets the mind wandering....

Why is the fresh hot break formed when working with extract?  I get it with all grain, but shouldn't that have already been done and destroyed during the initial manufacture of the DME?

And while I ask this question, I looked away from that pot and now I have to clean a boil over. Doh!

Offline klickitat jim

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2646
    • View Profile
Re: Why hot break?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2013, 06:44:45 PM »
Good question. Not certain but I suspect it is the point at which the contents go from suspended solids to in solution
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 06:46:27 PM by klickitat jim »

Offline In The Sand

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 397
    • View Profile
Why hot break?
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2013, 07:17:49 PM »
Lol
Trey W.

Offline klickitat jim

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2646
    • View Profile
Re: Why hot break?
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2013, 07:42:02 PM »
What is it? Now I'm curious too

Offline klickitat jim

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2646
    • View Profile
Re: Why hot break?
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2013, 07:48:22 PM »
Never mind, I went to the master

"The foam is caused by proteins in the wort that coagulate due to the rolling action of the boil. The wort will continue to foam until the protein clumps get heavy enough to sink back into the pot. You will see particles floating around in the wort. It may look like Egg Drop Soup. This is called the Hot break and may take 5-20 minutes to occur, depending on the amount of protein in your extract."
Palmer How to Brew