Author Topic: First Stir Plate Starter  (Read 1610 times)

Offline thebigbaker

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Re: First Stir Plate Starter
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2013, 08:18:58 AM »
I'll be doing mostly 1000ml starts, a few 2000. I bough two of them so hopefully they last a couple years

You should take a listen/read Neva Parker's Fermentation Mythbusters here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/lets-brew/homebrewing-seminars/2012

She'll go into why a 1L starter isn't really worth it - 2L starters are much better.

+1 to Neva Paker's presentation.  Very good info and I haven't done a 1L starter since.
Jeremy Baker

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: First Stir Plate Starter
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2013, 02:36:40 AM »
So, at 24 hrs I pulled the starter from the stir plate and put it in the fridge. It appears that by morning I will have about a half inch of slurry in the bottom of the 2000ml flask.

Can it sit like that for a few days, then decant and pitch?

Also I'm considering splitting that slurry between two 2000ml flasks and running them both for 24hrs in two qts 1.035 to build enough yeast for two 5 gal APAs.  Would that be sufficient?

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Re: First Stir Plate Starter
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2013, 03:15:54 AM »

[/quote]

You should take a listen/read Neva Parker's Fermentation Mythbusters here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/lets-brew/homebrewing-seminars/2012

She'll go into why a 1L starter isn't really worth it - 2L starters are much better.
[/quote]

+1 to Neva Paker's presentation.  Very good info and I haven't done a 1L starter since.
[/quote]

I wasn't able to watch the one on AHA because I've forgotten my password. But, I caught one of her presentations on YouTube. What she was saying there was about the 1M cells per ml per degree plato rule. She said that you can play with flavor by pitch rate changes. Under pitching apparently causes more growth, big surprise, which increases this and that.

I found it interesting that pitching big reduces acetaldehyde and fusel but increases ester. Which makes sense. The next part caught my eye. Increasing dissolved O2 actually counters that by increasing acetaldehyde and fusels and decreasing ester. The takeaway I got was that O2 was easier but not necessarily better depending on what you wanted in your end product.