Author Topic: Simcoe and Columbus?  (Read 970 times)

Offline goschman

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Simcoe and Columbus?
« on: June 05, 2013, 04:56:06 PM »
Is this a decent combo?

Not sure what I will be brewing but I am thinking about something lighter with light bitterness but moderate hop flavor and aroma. Should I consider using something more mild and low alpha instead of both of these together?

Offline narvin

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Re: Simcoe and Columbus?
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2013, 05:01:05 PM »
Great combo!  Columbus bittering, Simcoe and Columbus combo for late hops and dry hops.
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Offline kmshultz

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Re: Simcoe and Columbus?
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2013, 08:42:37 PM »
So you are looking to brew something "lighter" with Columbus and Simcoe? Have you used these hops before? ;) They are both pretty aggressive, though I suppose if you use restraint they could be less in-your-face. I recall recently listening to a Brewing Network podcast where the guys from Anchor were interviewed. The head brewer Mark Carpenter commented on how lovely a hop Citra can be, even (or maybe especially) when it's used in lesser amounts to showcase its subtleties, i.e. in Anchor Brekle's Brown.

Although I am very partial to the qualities of noble and noble-type hops myself, it seems these days that the old rule of low alpha hops being generally superior for refined flavor is being thrown out the window. I say if you want to brew a light/session ale with restrained usage of Simcoe and Columbus, go for it! Sounds like a fun (and different) kind of beer. The new craft brewers in England are brewing exactly these types of American-style session ales that are meant to display aggressive American hop character, but of course they aren't as hop-forward as the American beers!

Both of these hops are pretty dank and resinous. Simcoe in particular is sometimes known for that 'cat pee' character when it's used in higher amounts. I haven't used it in high amounts for just that reason. Seems like narvin's advice is pretty spot-on; Columbus is good as a bitter hop (and also late), and Simcoe is better left to late/dry-hop additions.

Good luck!

Cheers,
Kent
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Offline goschman

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Re: Simcoe and Columbus?
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2013, 08:00:38 AM »
Thanks guys. Simcoe is one of my favorite hops but I have had mixed feelings about Columbus. I am trying to redeem myself by reworking a recipe that I did for an all columbus wheat. I thought I was being reasonably conservative with hop amounts but went way overboard apparently. It's been in the keg for a couple of months now and is just starting to mellow a bit. I learned that I definitely don't like columbus by itself for bittering, flavor, and aroma.

If I redo this recipe I will probably throw in some simcoe and possibly something more mild and really cut a lot of the hops back..

Maybe I should just do an APA...I can never try anything normal.