Author Topic: SG question  (Read 1187 times)

Offline FLbrewer

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SG question
« on: June 09, 2013, 07:29:19 AM »
I came across this picture on instagram and I'm curious how someone can tell if they are talking OG or FG? And would you be able to tell from a "1.092" what range of a beer it would be? Thanks!

http://instagram.com/p/aUcAIdvdUP/

Offline duboman

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SG question
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2013, 07:57:39 AM »
That would definitely be OG or starting gravity and as to what kind of beer? A Big one:D

You can always post the question to the user and ask for the recipe or style of beer made
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Offline a10t2

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Re: SG question
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 08:02:04 AM »
When I click that link this is the caption:

Quote
Rockin a 1.092 on the "Atheist Turns Trappist" Belgian Dark Strong Ale... With the real Bato the Saint in the background... #craftbeer #belgianstrongale #homebrew #batothesaint

Maybe you aren't seeing that because of an ad blocker or something equally funky.
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Offline FLbrewer

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SG question
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2013, 08:10:49 AM »
No I see it, just curious for more explanation on how experienced home brewers can quickly identify what an SG means

Offline duboman

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SG question
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2013, 08:41:57 AM »

No I see it, just curious for more explanation on how experienced home brewers can quickly identify what an SG means

It generally comes to understanding a certain range of readings.

Session style beers will generally fall in a 1.040-1.055 SG, 5-6% style beers will be in the 1.055-1.070 range and big beers will be over that all the way up to 1.100+

The true ABV will come with the attenuation of the yeast. The bigger the beer generally the higher the FG but ideally finishing 1.020 or below. Most mid range beers should finish around 1.010+\-

You can read up on style guidelines and typical starting gravity at www.bjcp.org
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Offline erockrph

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Re: SG question
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2013, 08:56:10 AM »
Depending on beer style, an OG can generally be anywhere from the low 1.030's to 1.120 (or higher). An FG could be anywhere from the 1.030ish on down. But an SG reading can also be taken at any point between start and finish, so unless you are given the specific information about what the reading is it doesn't really have any meaning.

If I saw a pic with a reading of 1.092 I would assume it is an OG.
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Offline repo

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Re: SG question
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2013, 09:45:51 AM »
With specific gravity(sg) readings the larger the number, the more sugar in solution. With more sugar the potential for more alcohol.  The number does not indicate how fermentable the sugars are though. You can absolutely have a 1.06 og beer with less alcohol than a 1.055 beer. So by itself an og doesn't give you a whole lot.

Dubo man put forth some incorrect numbers, I can tell just by looking at them- the math doesn't add up.
 

Offline duboman

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SG question
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2013, 10:41:00 AM »
@Repo,

I was only stating some generalities pertaining to the OP's question.

Obviously there are a lot of variables that come into play with each specific batch so I can see where some of the math doesn't add up.

You are correct in that a lower gravity OG beer can have a higher ABV than a higher OG beer but that is not what I perceived to be the question originally:)
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Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: SG question
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2013, 06:04:50 AM »
If you look at this chart for BJCP styles, the absolute highest FG is 1.050 and all but Strong Scotch Ale fall below 1.030, so it is definately an OG. Very few styles even start that high, and color might help too, but only so much. Can't tell what yeast was used from a picture.
 
 

By the way, the graphic is from http://homebrewmanual.com/resources/
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Offline brewmasternpb

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Re: SG question
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2013, 10:01:28 PM »
Also, while this is strictly my opinion... Most people who brag about gravities usually brag about O.G.  If a brewer is proud of his final gravity, he usually won't brag about it unless people know what the starting gravity was.  For example, I was really proud of a final gravity of 1.022... for a Barleywine that started 1.102... A 1.022 gravity would not have been impressive in a picture though!
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