Author Topic: Scotch ale  (Read 2483 times)

Offline Jo Diesel

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 40
  • BEER! Its what makes me HAPPY
    • View Profile
Scotch ale
« on: June 27, 2013, 05:01:24 PM »
Was thinking about doing a Scotch ale this weekend. So far Im looking at 3oz peated malt. 3lb Special B and 25lb 2row. Have Nugget Magnum and Columbus hops

Offline klickitat jim

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3054
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2013, 05:35:47 PM »
I can't imagine 3 oz of anything would come out in a batch that size. Must be potent stuff

Offline gymrat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 854
  • Ralph's Brewery
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2013, 05:42:45 PM »
You sure are using a lot of American ingredients in your scotch ale.
Ralph's Brewery
Topeka, KS

Offline hoser

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 763
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2013, 06:22:28 PM »
Peat malt has no place in a Scotch ale, IMHO.  No matter how small the amount.  British/Scottish 2 row, roast barley, and boil down the first runnings a la Skotrat's recipe:

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ale/scottish/recipes/10.html 

Or JZ's Scotch Ale (Just increase the base malt, but keep your specialty grains the same to reach your desire OG)

http://beerdujour.com/Recipes/Jamil/JamilsScottishExport80.htm

The only hop you listed that I would use would be Magnum for bittering. Something British would be better, like EKG or Fuggles.. 

The same goes for your base malt, but you could probably get away with 2row, but Marris Otter or Golden Promise will have more character.

Offline AmandaK

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1030
  • Redbird Brewhouse
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2013, 06:23:52 PM »
Peat malt has no place in a Scotch ale, IMHO.  No matter how small the amount.  British/Scottish 2 row, roast barley, and boil down the first runnings a la Skotrat's recipe:

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ale/scottish/recipes/10.html

Exactly my thoughts.
Amanda Kertz
Kansas City Bier Meister
BJCP National

Redbird Brewhouse - Current Project: Full Basement Bar Build

Offline hokerer

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2634
  • Manassas, VA
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2013, 06:33:46 PM »
Peat malt has no place in a Scotch ale, IMHO.  No matter how small the amount.  British/Scottish 2 row, roast barley, and boil down the first runnings a la Skotrat's recipe:

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ale/scottish/recipes/10.html

Exactly my thoughts.

Mine too.  That recipe is 'da bomb' for a Wee Heavy
Joe

Online HoosierBrew

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2851
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 07:15:10 PM »
Peat malt has no place in a Scotch ale, IMHO.  No matter how small the amount.  British/Scottish 2 row, roast barley, and boil down the first runnings a la Skotrat's recipe:

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ale/scottish/recipes/10.html

Exactly my thoughts.

Mine too.  That recipe is 'da bomb' for a Wee Heavy
+1.  Awesome recipe. I brewed it a few years back.  I wouldn't change one thing, other than adding some bourbon soaked oak chips next time as I think it's a great compliment to a Scotch Ale (ala Backwoods Bastard). +1 to no peated malt ever.
Jon H.

Offline gymrat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 854
  • Ralph's Brewery
    • View Profile
Re: Scotch ale
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2013, 10:45:21 PM »
To me a scotch ale is not a scotch ale unless it is done with a British base malt and British hops. The recipe of a true scotch ale is simple. British pale malt, take the first gallon of runnings and boil it down to half a gallon to caramelize it, get the rest of your runnings and boil. That gives a caramel flavor and darkens it. Or you can make something that tastes really close by adding some caramel malt to British pale for flavor and some black patent for color.
Ralph's Brewery
Topeka, KS