Author Topic: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout  (Read 3054 times)

Offline pgattie

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base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« on: July 02, 2013, 08:31:50 AM »
I'm brewing my first Russian Imperial Stout this week. Trying to decide between two recipes. First one uses American 2-row (which I have) and the second uses Maris Otter. Most recipes I've seen use Maris Otter. Has anyone used 2-row for this style and had good results?

Offline garc_mall

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2013, 02:45:07 PM »
If it isn't going to make a flavor difference (With that much RB, what would?), I use standard american 2-row for most things. I only really use MO in my english style beers (Bitters, EPA) and GP in my Scottish beer. Other than that, it is American 2-row, with some munich for some toastyness. I have also heard that some victory can add that MO-like biscuityness.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2013, 03:19:46 PM »
If it isn't going to make a flavor difference (With that much RB, what would?), I use standard american 2-row for most things. I only really use MO in my english style beers (Bitters, EPA) and GP in my Scottish beer. Other than that, it is American 2-row, with some munich for some toastyness. I have also heard that some victory can add that MO-like biscuityness.
+1.  Under all the roasted barley, black patent, chocolate, and crystal, I think the MO gets mostly buried.  I made my last one with pale ale malt. I love MO for British styles where it is more apparent and worth the added $$.  +1 to Victory (or Biscuit).
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2013, 08:42:46 AM »
Agree with everything said above.  I love MO and prefer it in beers without darker malts so that the flavor can shine through.

For something like a RIS I think 2-row should be fine.

Of course, you won't go wrong with MO it's just that you're unlikely to get any real flavor benefit from it and it does cost a bit more.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2013, 08:58:31 AM »
I like to add in about 30% Munich I or II to boost the base malt flavors without adding unfermentable sugar.

IMO Munich makes a difference, but MO does not (in a RIS). Barleywine? Whole 'nother story
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Offline erockrph

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2013, 11:17:52 AM »
I like to add in about 30% Munich I or II to boost the base malt flavors without adding unfermentable sugar.

IMO Munich makes a difference, but MO does not (in a RIS). Barleywine? Whole 'nother story

I know I've used 2-row and MO interchangably in my Roast Porter and can't really pick out the difference. In something less roasty like a Brown Ale you'd probably be able to pick it out, but not in a RIS.

And agreed on the Munich. It works very nicely in a big, roasty beer.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2013, 11:23:15 AM »
I like to add in about 30% Munich I or II to boost the base malt flavors without adding unfermentable sugar.

IMO Munich makes a difference, but MO does not (in a RIS). Barleywine? Whole 'nother story

I know I've used 2-row and MO interchangably in my Roast Porter and can't really pick out the difference. In something less roasty like a Brown Ale you'd probably be able to pick it out, but not in a RIS.

And agreed on the Munich. It works very nicely in a big, roasty beer.
I use MO in British Brown Ale recipes and it's definitely noticeable there.  I just don't use it in anything more roasty. Big +1 to Munich in porters and stouts. Really balances the roast character well.
Jon H.

Offline garc_mall

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Re: base malt for Russian Imperial Stout
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2013, 09:02:08 AM »
I like to add in about 30% Munich I or II to boost the base malt flavors without adding unfermentable sugar.

IMO Munich makes a difference, but MO does not (in a RIS). Barleywine? Whole 'nother story

I know I've used 2-row and MO interchangably in my Roast Porter and can't really pick out the difference. In something less roasty like a Brown Ale you'd probably be able to pick it out, but not in a RIS.

And agreed on the Munich. It works very nicely in a big, roasty beer.
I use MO in British Brown Ale recipes and it's definitely noticeable there.  I just don't use it in anything more roasty. Big +1 to Munich in porters and stouts. Really balances the roast character well.

I put Munich in everything, so I think Munich works in any beer, roasty or not.  ;D
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